henbane


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hy·o·scy·a·mus

(hī'ō-sī'ă-mŭs),
The leaves and flowering tops of Hyoscyamus niger (family Solanaceae); contains hyoscyamine and hyoscine (scopolamine); an anticholinergic and antispasmodic.
Synonym(s): henbane
[G. hyoskyamos, henbane or hog's bean, fr. hys, gen. hyos, a hog, + kyamos, a bean]

henbane

(hĕn′bān′)
n.
A poisonous Eurasian plant (Hyoscyamus niger) in the nightshade family, having a strong odor, sticky leaves, and funnel-shaped greenish-yellow flowers. It is a source of hyoscyamine.

henbane

Herbal medicine
A herb that is the primary source of atropine, hyoscyamine and scopolamine; henbane was formerly used by herbalists, but is now regarded as unsafe by the FDA.

Toxic effects
Blurred vision, convulsions, delirium stupor, vertigo, and in high amounts, death.

henbane

References in periodicals archive ?
Influence of Urea fertilization on tropane Alkaloids content of henbane under hydroponic conditions.
Henbane - Hyoscyamus Niger - has sticky serrated leaves, yellow, funnel-shaped flowers and a stale scent.
In a statement, the magazine said: "Antony Worrall Thompson recommends using henbane in salads.
So erst the Sage with scientific truth In Grecian temples taught the attentive youth; With ceaseless change how restless atoms pass From life to life, a transmigrating mass; How the same organs, which to day compose The poisonous henbane, or the fragrant rose, May with to morrow's sun new forms compile, Frown in the Hero, in the Beauty smile.
Scientists discovered the remnants of a brew in a Neolithic pot in the Orkneys: it contained henbane, hemlock and deadly nightshade, ingredients that could kill but which in beer would produce mind-altering hallucinatory effects.
In general, it is likely that it was used from a very early period, along with other better-documented plants such as cannabis, henbane, and poppy, to spice up various lightly fermented fruit-based brews that preceded, and probably continued to form more readily available substitutes for, the elite use of grape-based wine (Sherratt 1995; see also Ruck 1986a and 1986b for a much more ambitious attempt at tracking the use of a wide variety of psychoactive plants in the hidden recesses of Greek cultural history).
The useful wild plants are: coltsfoot, comfrey, chickweed, cow parsley, docks, sorret (sour dock), dandelion, fat hen groundsel, heather, Plantain, Shepherds Purse, sow thistle, watercress, bind weed, celandine, foxglove, wild iris, fool's parsley, henbane, and lettuce.
What saves this from sentimentality is the precision of Clare's observations: he calls the roll of pellitory (a nettle-like plant), henbane, mallows, princess-feather tree, and green-linnet's nest, shaming our ignorance.
Jacob was eccentric to say the least, and--according to Fernande Olivier--he was addicted to ether and henbane, which apparently stimulated his powers as a 'pythia' (soothsayer).
1, 13) There are many beautiful flowers and ornamentals as petunia and Angel's trumpet, luscious vegetables, important medicinal drugs, such as atropine (dilates eye pupil), belladonna (relieves spasms, stimulates heart), and scopolamine (in sleeping pills), tobacco, and the many poisonous plants, such as Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), deadly nightshade (Solanum nigrum), and the foul smelling henbane (Hyoscyamus niger).
Lang and Melchers (1943) demonstrated that long-day black henbane (Hyoscyamus niger L.
all creeping things, here insects"] in eyes, take seed of henbane, shed it on gledes, add two saucers full of water, set them on two sides of the man, and let him sit there over them, jerk the head hither and thither over the fire and the saucers also, then the worms shed themselves into the water.