hemosiderin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hemosiderin: hemosiderosis

hemosiderin

 [he″mo-sid´er-in]
a pigment that is a product of hemolysis; it is an insoluble form of storage iron that is visible microscopically both with and without the use of special stains.

he·mo·sid·er·in

(hē'mō-sid'ĕr-in),
A golden yellow or yellow-brown insoluble protein produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin; found in most tissues, especially in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow, in the form of granules much larger than ferritin molecules (of which they are believed to be aggregates), but with a higher content, as much as 37%, of iron; stains blue with Perls Prussian blue stain.
[hemo- + G. sidēros, iron, + -in]

hemosiderin

(hē′mō-sĭd′ər-ĭn)
n.
An insoluble protein that contains iron, is produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin that is released during hemolysis of hemoglobin, and is found as granules in most tissues, especially the liver.

he·mo·sid·er·in

(hē'mō-sid'ĕr-in)
A yellow or brown protein produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin; found in most tissues, but especially in the liver; at higher levels, it stains blue with Perls Prussian blue stain.
Synonym(s): haemosiderin.
[hemo- + G. sidēros, iron, + -in]

he·mo·sid·er·in

(hē'mō-sid'ĕr-in)
A yellow or brown protein produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin; found in most tissues, but especially in the liver.
Synonym(s): haemosiderin.
[hemo- + G. sidēros, iron, + -in]
References in periodicals archive ?
Histopathologically AS shows degenerative features like hemorrhage, hemosiderin pigmentation, cellular atypia, areas of myxoid degeneration.7 In present case also all the histological features were noted accompanied by Antoni A and B cellular configuration with verocay bodies.
Histological examination of the excision piece described characteristics compatible with PVNS, with areas of extensive necrosis and the presence of hemosiderin deposits.
Consequently, these cells have phagocytosed the hemosiderin as a result of erythrocyte lysis, as described by Ramos et al (24) in visceral granuloma naturally diagnosed in cultured Sparus aurata.
Microscopic features of IPM, as fascicles of spindle cells with nuclear palisading, amianthoid fibers, hemosiderin pigment, and extravasated erythrocytes, were observed in our case.
Although a nonrecognizable cerebellar hemisphere in the posterior fossa mimicked primary cerebellar agenesis [4], T2 star-weighted angiography (SWAN) successfully detected hemosiderin deposits enveloping the cystic lesion, which led to the diagnosis of an acquired form of DWM and selection of a surgical intervention approach.
This showed acute tubular necrosis and significant deposition of hemosiderin, as shown by positive Perls staining.
The inflammatory cells included lymphocytes, plasma cells, hemosiderin eaden macrophages and numerous eosinophils.
Multiple punctate foci of bloom artifact projecting predominantly in the cortex in the right hemisphere as noted on GRE sequences represent hemosiderin deposition in areas of cerebral microhemorrhage (Figure 4).
Hemosiderin is often observed secondary to rupture of the vessels.
Lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, xanthoma cells, hemosiderin, and calcification were observed.
Some dotted low signals were noted in the bilateral basal ganglia lesions regions, which indicated old microbleeds and hemosiderin deposition instead of calcifications.