hemosiderin


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Related to hemosiderin: hemosiderosis

hemosiderin

 [he″mo-sid´er-in]
a pigment that is a product of hemolysis; it is an insoluble form of storage iron that is visible microscopically both with and without the use of special stains.

he·mo·sid·er·in

(hē'mō-sid'ĕr-in),
A golden yellow or yellow-brown insoluble protein produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin; found in most tissues, especially in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow, in the form of granules much larger than ferritin molecules (of which they are believed to be aggregates), but with a higher content, as much as 37%, of iron; stains blue with Perls Prussian blue stain.
[hemo- + G. sidēros, iron, + -in]

hemosiderin

/he·mo·sid·er·in/ (he″mo-sid´er-in) an insoluble form of tissue storage iron, visible microscopically both with and without the use of special stains.

hemosiderin

(hē′mō-sĭd′ər-ĭn)
n.
An insoluble protein that contains iron, is produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin that is released during hemolysis of hemoglobin, and is found as granules in most tissues, especially the liver.

hemosiderin

[hē′mōsid′ərin]
Etymology: Gk, haima + sideros, iron
an iron-rich pigment that is a product of red cell hemolysis. Iron is often stored in this form. Also spelled haemosiderin.

he·mo·sid·er·in

(hē'mō-sid'ĕr-in)
A yellow or brown protein produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin; found in most tissues, but especially in the liver; at higher levels, it stains blue with Perls Prussian blue stain.
Synonym(s): haemosiderin.
[hemo- + G. sidēros, iron, + -in]

he·mo·sid·er·in

(hē'mō-sid'ĕr-in)
A yellow or brown protein produced by phagocytic digestion of hematin; found in most tissues, but especially in the liver.
Synonym(s): haemosiderin.
[hemo- + G. sidēros, iron, + -in]

hemosiderin

an insoluble form of intracellular storage iron, visible microscopically both with and without the use of special stains.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary of Histologic Criteria of Intestinal Thrombotic Microangiopathy Histologic Definition Source, y Criteria Perivascular Patchy interstitial El-Bietar et al, (7) mucosal hemorrhage containing 2015;Inamoto et al, (15) hemorrhage fragmented and-or 2009;Narimatsu et al, degenerated RBCs at and (16) 2005; Nishida et al, close to where LP (17) 2004; Yamamoto et capillaries are al, (18) 2009;Hewamana et located;remote hemorrhage al, (34) 2009 can be replaced by hemosiderin and the area can be infiltrated by hemosiderin-laden macrophages.
b) Twenty one days post-inoculation of BCG can be seen granuloma formation (star) with fibroblasts (arrowhead) and pigments of hemosiderin (short arrow) (HE).
2) GRE and SWI imaging techniques rely on the presence of paramagnetic products in the blood such as hemosiderin to produce profound signal loss.
Therefore, this characteristic black colouration appears to indicate both hemosiderin and lipofuscin deposition, and the combination of hemosiderin and lipofuscin might enhance the black pigmentation of joint cartilage.
The analysis for the presence or absence of melanomacrophage centers containing hemosiderin in the kidney was performed by examining the slides stained with Prussian blue according to Perl's method (HOWARD et al.
Prussian blue staining of broncho-alveolar lavage centrifugate confirmed the presence of hemosiderin laden macrophages.
Many frugivorous avian species kept in captivity develop iron storage disease (ISD) as indicated by high concentrations of hepatic iron and hemosiderin deposits in hepatocytes or phagocytes.
Hemorrhage, hemosiderin pigments, inflammatory cells, and newly formed bone or calcified material may also present throughout the connective tissue.
Areas of increased signal intensity with or around the lesion and a rim of low-signal intensity due to the hemosiderin pigment may surround the lesion (Fig.
Pathologic examination of tissue biopsy is required for definitive diagnosis, and histologic appearance is characterized by hemosiderin deposition, histiocytic infiltrate, and giant cells.
Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens demonstrating lipid and hemosiderin laden macrophages and respiratory cultures showed few epithelial cells and white blood cells.
A skin biopsy showed only hemosiderin deposition but no organisms.