hemorrhoidectomy


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hemorrhoidectomy

 [hem″ŏ-roi-dek´to-me]
surgical excision of hemorrhoids. Barron ligation (or rubber band ligation) is a conservative surgical technique in which the hemorrhoids are bound with rubber bands so that the ligated portion sloughs away after several days. Laser procedures are also used.
Patient Care. Postoperatively the patient must be monitored for signs of hemorrhage; this is an uncommon occurrence but one that can develop quickly. The patient may be kept in either a prone position to relieve pressure on the operative site or a supine position (for a short period) with a rubber air ring under the buttocks for support. Warm sitz baths are usually begun the day after surgery, to relieve discomfort. Compresses of witch hazel or some other astringent agent may be applied to reduce swelling and promote healing. Difficulty in evacuating often occurs during the immediate postoperative period. The two most effective methods of relieving discomfort are keeping the area clean with multiple showers or sitz baths and maintaining a soft stool with a high-fiber diet and such agents as Metamucil.

hem·or·rhoid·ec·to·my

(hem'ō-roy-dek'tŏ-mē),
Surgical removal of hemorrhoids; usually accomplished by excision of hemorrhoidal tissues by sharp dissection, or by application of elastic ligature at the base of the hemorrhoidal bundles to produce ischemic necrosis and ultimate ablation of the hemorrhoidectomy.
[hemorrhoids + G. ektomē, excision]

hemorrhoidectomy

(hĕm′ə-roi-dĕk′tə-mē)
n. pl. hemorrhoidecto·mies
Surgical removal of hemorrhoids.

hemorrhoidectomy

Hemorrhoid surgery Surgery Excision of hemorrhoids Indications Refractory itching, pain, clots, bleeding. See Hemorrhoids.

hem·or·rhoid·ec·to·my

(hem'ŏr-oy-dek'tŏ-mē)
Surgical removal of hemorrhoids; usually accomplished by excision of hemorrhoidal tissues by sharp dissection, or by application of elastic ligature at the base of the hemorrhoidal bundles to produce ischemic necrosis and ultimate ablation of the hemorrhoidectomy.
Synonym(s): haemorrhoidectomy.
[hemorrhoids + G. ektomē, excision]
References in periodicals archive ?
This study assessed the effectiveness of a topical preparation of Aloe vera in reducing pain and improving symptoms following hemorrhoidectomy.
Consider rubber band ligation A systematic review of 3 poor-quality trials comparing rubber band ligation with excisional hemorrhoidectomy in patients with grade III hemorrhoids found that excisional hemorrhoidectomy produced better long-term symptom control but more immediate postoperative complications of anal stenosis and hemorrhage.
Stapled hemorrhoidopexy and Milligan Morgan hemorrhoidectomy in the cure of fourth-degree hemorrhoids: Long term evaluation and clinical results.
The patient, a 38-year-old man, is asymptomatic 3 months after hemorrhoidectomy.
Staple hemorrhoidectomy is an operator dependent technique involving cost issues as well4.
(10) Several randomized trials have demonstrated that the PPH is associated with low postoperative pain, low analgesic consumption, short length of surgery, early return to normal activities, and high patient satisfaction rates compared with traditional hemorrhoidectomy because the surgical staple line is situated above the dentate line, where there is no pain sensory receptor.
Local anaesthesia versus spinal anaesthesia for hemorrhoidectomy. AAMJ 2014;12(4)Suppl 2.
There are two especially well known surgical modalities for hemorrhoidectomy: open (Milligan-Morgan) (4) and closed (Ferguson) (5).
first described the Doppler guided Transanal Hemorrhoidal Dearterialization (THD) procedure, it has gained acceptance as a popular non-excisional hemorrhoidectomy operation.
Suspicion of anal stenosis is heightened by a history of hemorrhoidectomy, Crohn's disease, or laxative abuse [2, 4].
In some patients after Hemorrhoidectomy, sphincter injury can occur.
Of the 5719 surgical procedures that were performed, 31.4% (n=1795) were visceral surgeries (exploratory laparotomy, hernioplasty, hemorrhoidectomy, etc.), 24.4% (n = 1398) were wound surgeries (W: debridements, fasciotomies, finger amputations, etc.), and 19.3% (n = 1122) were gyneco-obstetric surgeries (C: Cesarean sections, ectopic pregnancies, vesicovaginal fistula, hysterectomy and variants, curettage, postpartum complications and others).