hemolytic transfusion reaction


Also found in: Acronyms.

hemolytic transfusion reaction

Transfusion medicine A therapy-related event mediated by 2 different mechanisms:
1. Intravascular hemolysis mediated by complement-fixing antibodies,.
2. Extravascular hemolysis mediated by noncomplement-fixing antibodies Clinical Fever, chills, pain at infusion site, intense back pain, hypotension, sense of impending doom, chest tightness, acute dyspnea, brochospasm, anaphylaxis, hyperbilirubinemia, hemoglobinuria, DIC with fibrinolysis Management Stop transfusion, treat shock–vasopressors, IV fluids, cortiocosteroids, maintain high fluid throughput, monitor anemia, transfuse with compatible blood.

hemolytic transfusion reaction

The destruction of donated and infused red blood cells by antibodies in the person receiving the transfusion.
See: transfusion reaction
References in periodicals archive ?
To avoid the harmful consequences of these hemolytic transfusion reactions, and to ensure that donor RBCs survive in the recipient, blood banks and hospital laboratories routinely perform pretransfusion compatibility testing.
The various transfusion reactions observed were febrile reactions, hemolytic transfusion reactions, circulatory overload, allergic and anaphylactic reactions.
The most common causes of IgG-mediated hemolysis are warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA) and delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR).
Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in children with sickle cell disease.
6 mMol/L which is very significant given that in vivo serum lactic acid levels above 4 mmol/L are associated with 11% survival in ICU patients if persistent for 24 hours, and the potential complications of a hemolytic transfusion reaction superimposed on severe lactic acidosis would most likely ensure death.
A case of acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Dia antibody: A case report.
The inability to detect clinically significant antibodies could place patients at an increased risk for developing a hemolytic transfusion reaction.
There are 3 basic clinical scenarios for which the DAT is used: (1) investigation of suspected alloimmune-mediated hemolytic transfusion reactions, (2) evaluation for HDFN, and (3) investigation of autoimmune-mediated hemolytic anemia.
With stringent institutional and blood bank policies, a hemolytic transfusion reaction rarely occurs.
Because the antibodies formed in response to red cell transfusions or pregnancies tend to fade or disappear, a previously sensitized patient is a likely candidate for a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with subsequent transfusions (26).
Release of mediators of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the course of a severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by anti-D.
An immediate hemolytic transfusion reaction apparently caused by anti-Di'.