hemolytic

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Related to hemolytic component: Total hemolytic complement

hemolytic

 [he″mo-lit´ik]
pertaining to, characterized by, or producing hemolysis.
hemolytic anemia anemia caused by the increased destruction of erythrocytes. A frequently fatal type occurs in infants as a result of Rh incompatibility with the mother's blood (see Rh factor and erythroblastosis fetalis). Other types result from mismatched blood transfusions; from industrial poisons such as benzene, trinitrotoluene (TNT), or aniline; and from hypersensitivity to certain antibiotics and tranquilizers (drug-induced hemolytic anemia). Another important cause is mechanical obstruction caused by microvascular or valvular abnormalities. In addition, it sometimes occurs as a result of a disorder of the immune response in which B-cell–produced antibodies fail to recognize the body's own erythrocytes and directly attack and destroy them (autoimmune hemolytic anemia). Finally, some types of hemolytic anemia appear in the course of other diseases such as leukemia, hodgkin's disease, other types of cancer, acute alcoholism, and liver diseases. Along with the usual symptoms of anemia, the patient may exhibit jaundice. If the cause of the condition can be determined, and if it can be successfully treated, there is a good chance of recovery. steroids and transfusion therapy are used to treat some types. In other cases, surgical removal of the spleen may bring about great improvement.
hemolytic disease of newborn erythroblastosis fetalis.
hemolytic jaundice a rare, chronic, and generally hereditary disease characterized by periods of excessive hemolysis due to abnormal fragility of the erythrocytes, which are small and spheroidal. It is accompanied by enlargement of the spleen and by jaundice. The hereditary form is also known as familial acholuric jaundice; there is also a rare acquired form. See also hyperbilirubinemia.
hemolytic uremic syndrome a form of thrombotic microangiopathy with renal failure, hemolytic anemia, and severe thrombocytopenia and purpura, usually seen in children but occurring at any age. Some authorities consider it identical to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

he·mo·lyt·ic

(hē'mō-lit'ik),
Destructive to blood cells, resulting in liberation of hemoglobin.

he·mo·lyt·ic

(hē'mō-lit'ik)
Destructive to blood cells, resulting in liberation of hemoglobin.
Synonym(s): hematolytic, hemotoxic (2) , hematotoxic, hematoxic, haemolytic.

Hemolytic

Referring to the destruction of the cell membranes of red blood cells, resulting in the release of hemoglobin from the damaged cell.

hemolytic

pertaining to, characterized by, or producing hemolysis.

hemolytic anemia
anemia caused by the increased destruction of erythrocytes which may occur in the vascular system—intravascular hemolysis, or due to phagocytosis by the monocyte-macrophage system—extravascular or intracellular hemolysis. It may result from incompatibility (see alloimmune hemolytic anemia of the newborn), from mismatched blood transfusions, from poisons such as copper, organic agents in plants such as kale, from nutritional deficiencies such as phosphorus and from protozoan infections such as babesiosis. Hemolytic anemia may also occur as a result of a disorder of the immune response in which B cell-produced antibodies fail to recognize erythrocytes that are 'self' and directly attack and destroy them. In addition to the usual signs of anemia, the patient may also exhibit jaundice.
hemolytic component
a degree of extravascular hemolysis in association with other types of anemia.
hemolytic disease of the newborn
see alloimmune hemolytic anemia of the newborn.
hemolytic enterotoxemia
a little reported disease recorded mostly in Australia in sheep, cattle and foals; a highly fatal hemolytic anemia associated with a heavy population of Clostridium perfringens type A in the intestines.
hemolytic plaque assay
see plaque assay.
hemolytic-uremic syndrome
a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia and severe involvement of renal vasculature which leads to acute renal failure. In humans associated with verocytoxin-producing bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Shigella and some Salmonella; usually associated with the ingestion of poorly cooked meat. A similar clinical syndrome has been reported in cows, horses and dogs.