Hemiptera

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Related to hemipterans: order Hemiptera

Hemiptera

 [hem-ip´ter-ah]
the true bugs, an order of arthropods (class Insecta) with over 30,000 species, usually characterized by the presence of two pairs of wings and mouth parts adapted for piercing or sucking.

He·mip·ter·a

(hem-ip'tĕr-ă),
An arthropod order of the class Insecta that includes many plant lice and other true bugs; those of the subfamily Triatominae are bloodsuckers and of medical importance. The best known species is Cimex lectularius, the common bedbug.
[hemi- + G. pteron, wing]
References in periodicals archive ?
Insect secretions and their effect on plant growth, with special reference to hemipterans. Pp.
Because of the recent expansion of cowpea production into the cerrado (savannah) areas of the country, it is critical that identification of phytophagous hemipterans on this crop be conducted, including any associated egg parasitoids.
The richness of morphospecies of hemipterans had a positive correlation in PF (r= 0.44, p= 0.008) and a negative correlation in MF (r= -0.32, p= 0.03).
The only other major food group (17.1%) for big brown bats was hemipterans. No lepidopterans were in pellets collected from the 24 E.
Biting hemipterans were rare and represented a small percentage (usually <2%) of invertebrate communities.
Numerically, ants comprized the greater percentage of the stomach contents (49.7%) followed by homopterans (16.7%) and hemipterans (12.8%).
The stomach of both individuals contained recently eaten insects, including coleopterans (Scarabaeidae and Carabidae), lepidopterans, hemipterans, and dipterans (Culicidae and others).
Hemipterans are recorded from elevations ranging from sea level to above 5,400 m.
The impact of interplanting crops with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) on the density of predator hemipterans was evaluated.
True bugs, scientifically known as Hemipterans, also include pond and lake dwellers.
The prey of the eastern pipistrelles we captured consisted of two families of Homopterans: Cicadellidae (leafhoppers), Delphacidae (planthoppers); two families of Coleopterans: Carabidae (ground beetles) and Scarabaeidae (scarab beetles); three families of Dipterans: Chironomidae (midges), Tipulidae (crane flies), and Trichoceridae (winter crane flies); two families of Hymenopterans: Ichneumonidae (ichneumons) and Formicidae (ants); and one family of Hemipterans: Lygaeidae (seed bugs; Table II).