hemipteran


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hemipteran

(hĭ-mĭp′tər-ən)
n.
Any of numerous insects of the order Hemiptera, having mouthparts used for piercing and sucking and two pairs of wings, and including the cicadas, the aphids, and the heteropterans, such as the assassin bugs and the water striders.

he·mip′ter·an, he·mip′ter·ous (-tə-rəs) adj.

hemipteran

any EXOPTERYGOTE of the order Hemiptera, containing the true bugs, including leaf hoppers, cochineal insects, scale insects, bed bugs and aphids. They can cause considerable economic damage, and include both plant and animal parasites sucking plant sap or blood by means of piercing mouthparts. Normally they possess two pairs of wings, the forewings being at least partially hardened, like the elytra (see COLEOPTERA of beetles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Statistical comparison of the cumulative values for species richness reveals a significant difference in hemipteran density.
Most recently, exposure to hemipteran insect saliva was reported to infer protection against lesion development in laboratory mouse models (21).
multiplicata in southwestern of Coahuila feeds on ants, homopterans, and hemipterans as the numerically most common food items, but that volumetrically, beetles represented more than 40% of the stomach content followed by larvae of lepidopterans and homopterans.
A single prey record in AMGS involves a female pinned with a small hemipteran (Membracidae).
The other hemipteran, an unidentified water boatman (Corixidae), was represented by 15 adults and 42 numphs; some specimens were slightly decayed.
2004), although other arthropods such as termites, lepidopteran larvae, and hemipterans are part of its diet (Barbault and Maury, 1981).
In both species, most hemipterans were in the family Lygaeidae (chinch bugs), while other families included Pentatomidae (stink bugs) and Miridae (leaf bugs).
Macroinvertebrates were collected from eight taxonomic groups: one suborder, Zygoptera, and seven families, including the coleopterans Gyrinidae and Hydrophilidae, odonates Aeshnidae and Libellulidae, and hemipterans Belostomatidae, Corixidae, and Notonectidae.
Dipterans (10-21% volume, 12-25% frequency), lepidopterans (20-25% volume, 16-19% frequency), and hemipterans (2-13% volume, 19-27% frequency) comprised the next largest portions of diet.
Declines in honeydew-producing hemipterans may be a factor, but [I] have not seen a clear association as there are confounding factors like removal of invasive plants or occasional underbrush clearing.