hemifacial spasm


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Related to hemifacial spasm: blepharospasm

hemifacial spasm

a disorder of the facial nerve characterized by unilateral involuntary paroxysmal contractions of the facial muscles, caused by high-frequency bursts of motor units lasting from a few msec to several seconds; reported causes include compression of the ipsilateral facial nerve near its exit from the pons by a vascular malformation, compression of the ipsilateral facial nerve by a posterofossa neoplasm, and idiopathic derivations.

hemifacial spasm

he·mi·fa·cial spasm

(hem'ē-fā'shăl spazm)
A facial nerve disorder, with onset in late adult life, characterized by episodes of irregular, sometimes painful, myoclonic contractions of various facial muscles; triggered by voluntary or reflex movements of the face, spasm typically begins in the orbicularis oculi muscle and then spreads; occasionally a sequela of Bell palsy, but more often the result of proximal compression of the facial nerve by an aberrant blood vessel or neoplasm.

he·mi·fa·cial spasm

(hem'ē-fā'shăl spazm)
Disorder of facial nerve characterized by unilateral involuntary paroxysmal contractions of facial muscles, caused by high-frequency bursts of motor units lasting from a few milliseconds to several seconds.

hemifacial

affecting one side of the face.

hemifacial spasm
hypertonicity of facial muscles may occur with increased irritability of the facial nerve as in otitis media or lesions of the brainstem.
References in periodicals archive ?
86) noted no change in duration of effect after BoNT injection in hemifacial spasm (mean follow-up 90.
CASE 2: A 52 year old gentle man had history of typical left sided hemifacial spasm, with sensorineural hearing loss.
Clinical usefulness of magnetic resonance cisternography in patients having hemifacial spasm.
Hemifacial spasm usually begins in the orbicularis oculi, and it can spread to involve the muscles of the brow, lower face, and neck.
It is currently approved in over 70 countries providing significant clinical benefits for previously untreated disorders in a broad range of neurological and aesthetic conditions including cervical dystonia, juvenile cerebral palsy, strabismus (crossed eyes), blepharospasm (uncontrollable blinking), post-stroke spasticity, hemifacial spasm, hyperhidrosis and glabellar lines.
Botox was approved by United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1989 for the treatment of strabismus, blepharospasm and hemifacial spasms in patients over 12 years old [7].
The patient had also experienced headaches, hemifacial spasms, and fever in 2005 and was diagnosed with neuro-Behcet's disease (NBD).
Chapters cover anatomy of the facial nerve, neurophysiology of the facial nerve and nerve regeneration, causes of facial palsy, testing of the facial nerve, Bell's palsy, facial palsy in infection, facial nerve in temporal bone fractures, iatrogenic injury of the facial nerve during surgery of chronic suppurative otitis media, facial nerve in the parotid gland, hemifacial spasms, syndromes associated with facial palsy, tumors causing facial palsy, plastic- surgical repair of the paralyzed face, facio-hypoglossal jump anastomoses for reanimation of the paralyzed face, and anesthesia for otologic surgery.
The Yale Botulinum Program also uses Botox to treat blepharospasm, which affects the eyelids; hemifacial spasms, which affect one side of the face; and general spasticity, which may occur when the brain is damaged by a stroke, head injury, multiple sclerosis, etc.
Our collaboration has already resulted in drastic improvements in instrumentation, which has helped countless patients suffering from acoustic neuromas, meningiomas, pineal tumors and pituitary tumors as well as abnormalities such as hemifacial spasms and trigeminal neuralgia.