hemifacial spasm


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Related to hemifacial spasm: blepharospasm

hemifacial spasm

a disorder of the facial nerve characterized by unilateral involuntary paroxysmal contractions of the facial muscles, caused by high-frequency bursts of motor units lasting from a few msec to several seconds; reported causes include compression of the ipsilateral facial nerve near its exit from the pons by a vascular malformation, compression of the ipsilateral facial nerve by a posterofossa neoplasm, and idiopathic derivations.

he·mi·fa·cial spasm

(hem'ē-fā'shăl spazm)
A facial nerve disorder, with onset in late adult life, characterized by episodes of irregular, sometimes painful, myoclonic contractions of various facial muscles; triggered by voluntary or reflex movements of the face, spasm typically begins in the orbicularis oculi muscle and then spreads; occasionally a sequela of Bell palsy, but more often the result of proximal compression of the facial nerve by an aberrant blood vessel or neoplasm.

he·mi·fa·cial spasm

(hem'ē-fā'shăl spazm)
Disorder of facial nerve characterized by unilateral involuntary paroxysmal contractions of facial muscles, caused by high-frequency bursts of motor units lasting from a few milliseconds to several seconds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pathogenesis and Treatment of Hemifacial Spasm [M]/Microvascular Decompression Surgery.
Table 1: Average intraocular pressure (a) in the involved eyes of patients with hemifacial spasm before and after Botox injections using Goldmann applanation tonometry and noncontact air puff tonometry.
Hemifacial spasm is the unilateral, repetitive tonic or clonic contraction of the facial muscles innervated by the facial nerve.
Key Words: Hemifacial Spasm (HFS), Microvascular decompression (MVD), Facial nerve decompression
Of the five patients with HFS, all five had an excellent outcome with complete resolution of their hemifacial spasm. The two patients with geniculate neuralgia did not experience significant benefit and were classified as BNI class IV at last followup.
Facial dystonias and hyperkinetic states (hemifacial spasm, essential blepharospasm, and Meige's syndrome) can also occur.
Indeed, the Food and Drug Administration last February approved Type A treatment for people 13 years and older afflicted with any of three dystonias: strabismus, benign essential blepharospasm (spasmodic closing of the eyelids) and hemifacial spasm (in which one half of the face undergoes sudden muscle contractions).
[USPRwire, Tue Jul 23 2019] Facial spasm or hemifacial spasm is frequent involuntary contraction of facial muscles on one side of face.
[ClickPress, Thu Jan 03 2019] Facial spasm or hemifacial spasm is frequent involuntary contraction of facial muscles on one side of face.