hematozoon

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Related to hematozoa: Coccidia, plasmodium, Apicomplexa, Haemosporida

he·mo·zo·on

(hē'mō-zō'on),
A blood-dwelling parasitic animal such as the trypanosomes or microfilariae of Wuchereria or Brugia.
Synonym(s): hematozoon
[hemo- + G. zōon, animal]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hematozoon

(hē′mə-tō-zō′ŏn′, hĭ-măt′ə-)
n. pl. hemato·zoa (-zō′ə)
A parasitic protozoan or similar organism that lives in the blood.

he′ma·to·zo′al, he′ma·to·zo′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

he·mo·zo·on

(hē'mō-zō'on)
A parasitic animal that resides in the blood of the host.
Synonym(s): hematozoon, haemozoon.
[hemo- + G. zōon, animal]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Intracellular hematozoa of raptors: a review and update.
Peirce, "The significance of avian hematozoa in conservation strategies," in Diseases and Treatened Birds, J.
Notably, phylogenetic comparison of 479 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene derived from protozoan cyst-like structures with known sequences of avian hematozoa found 99%-100% homology of parasites from both outbreaks with the avian malaria parasites (Haemoproteus spp.) of European songbirds (Figure).
The positive relationship between WBC levels and the intensity of haemoproteid infection recalls hematological changes that accompany infection with other avian hematozoa, such as Leucocytozoon spp.
Hemograms and hematozoa of sharp-shinned (Accipiter striatus) and Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii) captured during spring migration in northern New York.
Malaria diagnosis was based on the identification of hematozoa on a thin blood film and/or on a thick blood film stained with Giemsa.
None of the toads of either species harbored trematodes, hematozoa in the blood, or coccidian oocysts in the feces.
No hematozoa were found in the 52 blood smears examined from male sharp-tailed grouse.
This finding confirmed the scarcity of hematozoa in polar regions and provided baseline data for the little auk.