helminth


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helminth

 [hel´minth]
a parasitic worm; see nematode and trematode.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hel·minth

(hel'minth),
An intestinal vermiform parasite, primarily nematodes, cestodes, trematodes, and acanthocephalans.
[G. helmins, worm]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

helminth

(hĕl′mĭnth′)
n.
A parasitic worm, especially a roundworm or tapeworm.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hel·minth

(hel'minth)
Any intestinal vermiform parasite, primarily nematodes, cestodes, trematodes, and acanthocephalans.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

helminth

(hĕl′mĭnth) [Gr. helmins, worm]
1. A wormlike animal.
Enlarge picture
REPRESENTATIVE HELMINTHS
2. Any animal, either free-living or parasitic, belonging to the phyla Platyhelminthes (flatworms), Acanthocephala (spinyheaded worms), Nemathelminthes (threadworms or roundworms), or Annelida (segmented worms). See: illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

helminth

A worm, especially a parasitic NEMATODE or fluke (TREMATODE). From the Greek helmins , a worm.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

helminth

a PLATYHELMINTH worm.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Helminth

A type of parasitic worm. Threadworms belong to a subcategory of helminths called nematodes, or roundworms.
Mentioned in: Threadworm Infection
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hel·minth

(hel'minth)
Intestinal vermiform parasite, primarily nematodes, cestodes, trematodes, and acanthocephalans.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of prevalence of Ancylostomes and other helminths based on different age groups.
Soil-transmitted helminth infections should be considered when conducting differential diagnosis in patients with concealed gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia that cannot be explained by other causes (2,3).
Helminth parasites of the Lesser Scaly Anole, Anolis uniformis (Squamata: Dactyloidae), from Los Tuxtlas, Southern Mexico: evidence of diet and habitat use.
Helminth taxa might respond differently to anthelmintics (e.g., ascarid eggs might be less likely to have abnormalities after exposure, whereas this development has been noted in Trichuris spp.) (11, 12).
Immediately after killing, the fishes were visually examined for any ectoparasite and then a thorough examination of the whole body for helminth infestation was done with the help of hand lens or dissecting microscope.
Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of intestinal helminths in puppies attending for governmental veterinary services at Libertador Municipality in Caracas and to identify the risk factors associated to the parasitic infection.
Helminths of the wild boar (Susscrofa L.) in natural and breeding conditions.
An analysis for the prevalence of human intestinal helminth parasites in urban and suburban communities of Islamabad.
Subramani et al., "Coincident filarial, intestinal helminth, and mycobacterial infection: Helminths fail to influence tuberculin reactivity, but BCG influences hookworm prevalence," The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
In Europe, filarioid helminths of veterinary and/or medical relevance have mainly been documented in Mediterranean regions, but increasingly these pathogens are being reported in temperate climate zones in Central and Northern Europe as well [1-3].
Helminth infections might protect against T1D diabetes development by disrupting the pathways leading to the Th1-mediated destruction of insulin-producing beta cells mediated by mechanisms related to the capacity of the host to mount a Th2 response to parasites, thus, decreasing the frequency of T1D [4].