helicy

helicy

 [he´lĭ-se]
a principle of homeodynamics in the science of unitary human beings; the continuous, innovative, and unpredictable increasing diversity of human and environmental field patterns.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Roger's principle of helicy: The relationship of human field motion and power (Doctoral dissertation).
This speaks to Rogers' field interactions and principles of integrality, triggering the potential for increasing presence of resonancy and helicy.
Alligood (2002) went on to align the three SUHB homeodynamic principles-resonancy, helicy, and integrality--with the three concepts of the theory of the art of nursing.
Using Rogers' SUHB conceptual framework principles of homeodynamics, which are resonancy, helicy, and integrality was the means to identify and synthesize the discovery of the four manifestations (Rogers, 1970, 1990, 1992).
The principles of homeodynamics evolved from reciprocy, synchrony, helicy, and resonancy (Rogers, 1970) to helicy, resonancy, and complementarity (Rogers, 1980a) to helicy, resonancy, and integrality (Rogers, 1986).
Theories have been derived from Rogers' postulates of energy fields, pattern, openness, pandimensionality, and principles of resonancy, helicy, and integrality for the purpose of guiding research and practice.
Morris (1991) and Hills (1998) link well-being with awareness based on integrality, resonancy, and helicy. An understanding of these homeodynamic principles is essential to the definition of well-being.
Rogers' principles of helicy, resonancy, and integrality became easier to grasp when applied to patient assessment using the picture scale.
Rogers' principle of helicy: The relationship of human field motion and power.
The principle of helicy shows continuous, innovative, increasing diversity in the changing universe pattern that is unpredictable.
Her four principles, reciprocy, synchrony, helicy, and resonancy, were later modified to three.
The concept of environment is a patterned, pandimensional energy field where health is seen as an expression of the life process and the goal of nursing is to facilitate well being through intentional mutual patterning including environmental patterning to promote helicy, integrality and resonancy (Fawcett, 1993).