heel pain

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heel pain

; heel pain syndrome pain and inflammation at the proximal plantar fascia; typically affects the middle-aged with a positive history of increased activity, prolonged standing, recent weight gain and/or a body mass index of >25 Table 1
Table 1: Rearfoot pain
Location of painPossible causes
Posterior aspect of heelSever's disease/traction apophysitis
Duck bill fracture of calcaneum
Haglund's deformity
Insertional calcific Achilles tendinosis
Deep retrocalcaneal bursitis
Superficial retrocalcaneal bursitis
Achilles tendinitis
Partial rupture of Achilles tendon
Total rupture of the Achilles tendon
Blisters
Chilblain/perniosis
Inferior (plantar) aspect of heelCalcaneal fracture
Osteoid osteoma
Calcaneal spur
Baxter's neuritis
Sero-negative and sero-positive inflammatory joint disease
Plantar calcaneal bursitis (policeman's heel; stone bruise; subcalcaneal bursitis)
Proximal plantar fasciitis
Proximal foot strain
S1 entrapment neuropathy/radiculopathy
Medial calcaneal nerve entrapment neuropathy
Corn/callosity
Verruca pedis
Medial aspect of the heelDeltoid ligament strain/sprain
Tibialis posterior tendinitis
Tibialis posterior rupture/partial rupture
Flexor hallucis longus tendinitis
Flexor digitorum longus tendinitis
Lateral aspect of the heelLateral collateral ligament strain/sprain
Peroneus longus tendinitis
Peroneus brevis tendinitis
Anterior aspect of ankleOsteochondritis dissecans of the talus
Anterior impingement
Extensor retinaculitis
Periphery of heelHeel fissures
Tinea pedis
References in periodicals archive ?
Current approaches to the management of plantar heel pain syndrome, including the role of injectable corticosteroids.
14) This adaptive process would normally not produce pain, however if during any stage of the process the stress levels were to overcome the connective tissue formation then micro tearing and inflammation would develop causing the characteristic heel pain syndrome.
Plantar fasciitis, also known as heel spurs or heel pain syndrome, affects approximately 6,500,000 new patients a year in the United States.
The OssaTron is a noninvasive extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) device for the treatment of chronic heel pain syndrome.