hedonism

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hedonism

 [he´don-izm]
1. pleasure-seeking behavior.
2. the ethical doctrine that regards pleasure and happiness as the highest good.
3. in psychology, the theory that the attainment of pleasure and the avoidance of pain are the prime motivators of human behavior. adj. adj hedon´ic.

hedonism

/he·do·nism/ (he´din-izm)
1. pleasure-seeking behavior.
2. the doctrine that regards pleasure and happiness as the highest good.
3. the theory that the attainment of pleasure and the avoidance of pain are the prime motivators of human behavior.hedon´ic

hedonism

(hēd′n-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Pursuit of or devotion to pleasure, especially to the pleasures of the senses.
2. Psychology The doctrine holding that behavior is motivated by the desire for pleasure and the avoidance of pain.

he′don·ist n.
he′don·is′tic adj.
he′don·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

hedonism

Pleasure-seeking behavior. Cf Anhedonia.

hedonism

The philosophic and psychological proposition that pleasure, or gratification, is the only ultimate good, and that the pursuit of pleasure is the ultimate motivating force. The concept of ‘pleasure’ is, of course, susceptible to a variety of definitions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It you like wines that hedonistically suggest chocolate and vanilla flavors, you'll love this thick, satisfying wine.
This led to a general shift in outward attitude among many intellectuals (like Tasso and Sperone Speroni) from seeing art hedonistically, as being just for pleasure, to seeing its instructive purpose.
It is striking how all States came to comprehend the celebration as at least a partially sacred one of basic religious significance, though not all had linked religion to the concept of nation as Queensland had done, because they could not consistently reject the desire of many citizens to spend part of the day hedonistically.
WM: In your interview with Ashbery, he talks about poetry having an inherent and hedonistically moral capacity to push the reader back into life, and that this obviates any direct political character or responsibility that a poem may be expected to have.
He concludes that this experience will become more attractive in the "affluent, hedonistically liberal, increasingly dedogmatized West" and that a rational mysticism might ensue:
At the foundation of classical social theory lies the conception of human nature that produces the fully autonomous, rational, materially, and hedonistically self-interested individual.
I stumble about, sometimes hedonistically, in that word-world; I let myself be ambushed by sense or sensation and forget the drive toward a single, all-conquering truth; and I unravel the text only as it is simultaneously rethreaded on the spool of commentary.
She might reason, for example, as follows: "Etiquette precludes me from choosing A in the presence of a, so I might as well do as well as I otherwise can hedonistically and choose O.
Utility became hedonistically defined and analytically translated into the "more is better" rationality of neoclassical consumer theory measured in the exchange value of goods and services (Fisher, 1927; Harsanyi, 1953; Sen, 1970).
We were all hedonistically indulging in space and showers.