heat-related death


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heat-related death

Forensic medicine A death with a core body temperature ≥ 40.6ºC/105ºF with no other reasonable explanation of death At-risk groups Elderly, those living alone, alcoholics. See Heat wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study also showed that heat-related death rates were generally higher in the most urbanized areas than in less urbanized areas, although some of the highest rates occurred in rural areas of the South and West.
During 2000-2011, approximately 447 heat-related emergency department visits, 152 hospital admissions, and 13 heat-related deaths occurred each year in New York City.
Higher surface temperature and less vegetative cover could increase the risk of heat-related death by contributing to greater heat stress because of increased temperatures indoors and outdoors or by making travel to an air-conditioned place (e.g., NYC cooling center) more difficult during hot weather.
Nearly 60% of all heat-related deaths among crop workers occurred in July, and most deaths occurred in the afternoon.
Previous analyses of the risk factors associated with heat-related deaths * have been based on the underlying cause ([dagger]) entered on the death certificate (4,5) and have not included decedents for whom hyperthermia was listed as a contributing factor but not the underlying cause of death.
* Of the 4,686 (98%) heat-related deaths attributed to weather for which age of the decedent was reported, 260 (6%) occurred among children aged < 15 years, 2,356 (50%) among persons aged 15-64 years, and 2,070 (44%) among persons aged [greater than or equal to] 65 years (3).
The more novel finding of this study is that the risk of heat-related death in the summer was higher when we classified the preceding wintertime mortality burden as low versus high.
* Evaluate persons at risk for heat-related death frequently for heat-related hazards and illnesses, and take appropriate preventive action.
Individuals with at most a high school education had higher heat-related death rates than did those with more years of education in studies of seven U.S.
The London School of Economics' Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change predicted there could be up to 100 heat-related deaths this weekend, based on Public Health England annual heat-related death rates.
Alabama HRI data were obtained from the Alabama Department of Public Health for reporting period June 29, 2012, through September 15, 2012, which included the following fields: type (HRI or heat-related death), facility county, age group (1-14, 15-24, 25-44, 45-59, or 60+), sex, contributing factor (athletic related, work related, or other), and entry timestamp.
Heat-related death and mental illness during the 1999 Cincinnati heat wave.