heat ray


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heat ray

Radiation whose wavelength is between 3,900 and 14,000 A.U. Shorter wavelength heat sources penetrate tissues better than longer (infrared) sources.
See: heat
See also: ray
References in periodicals archive ?
Schoeller has recently developed a new textile finish that helps textiles better absorb the sun's heat rays. Even thin fabrics can provide more warmth and keep the wearer comfortably warm.
The intense heat rays caused by the bomb charred the bodies of many victims.
TOKYO - A piece of clothing scorched in the shape of diamond patterns by the heat rays of the 1945 atomic bomb has been found to have been kept at the Ground Self-Defense Force Medical School in Tokyo's Setagaya Ward, according to interviews with school officials.
"An atomic bomb is designed to enable mass-killing and mass-destruction by causing blast waves and heat rays and releasing neutron radiation.
The sun's radiant heat rays penetrate through organic roofing material such as asphalt shingles, transferring heat directly into the home.
War of the Worlds - Alive on Stage recounts the tale of an unnamed narrator who wanders through the suburbs of London as Martians holed up in armoured tripods ravage Britain with flaming heat rays.
The intense heat rays, blast winds, radiation, and ceaseless fires...They claimed the precious lives of 74,000 people, while inflicting deep physical and mental wounds on those who narrowly escaped death.
The Hiroshima bomb, nicknamed "Little Boy", unfurled a mix of shockwaves, heat rays and radiation, killing thousands instantly.
Tom Weathers is strongest of these new survivors: he can fly, he has superhuman strength, he can shoot heat rays from his hands--and he's involved in a righteous cause--any one.
Sweeping aside all resistance with their three-legged fighting machines and deadly heat rays, mankind is brought to the edge of extinction before nature comes to its aid.
Decades ago, materials scientists discovered that heating vanadium dioxide above 68[degrees]C transforms it from a semiconductor that lets heat rays through to a more metallic substance that reflects them.
Invisible heat rays can burn and scar the retina at the back of the eye, which can cause blindness.