heat ray


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heat ray

Radiation whose wavelength is between 3,900 and 14,000 A.U. Shorter wavelength heat sources penetrate tissues better than longer (infrared) sources.
See: heat
See also: ray
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, their skin efficiently absorbs the heat rays and this thermal energy allows the animal to accelerate and react quickly.
The three-tonne, 35-foot tall, three-legged and faintly comical bug-eyed alien descended on stage last night boasting new and improved heat rays, which burst with real flame from the metal mouth.
Live performance by 46 musicians plus an 11-foot high 3D photo-real floating hologram of Richard Burton, In Sight and Sound, as George Herbert, The Journalist Lest we forget the three-tonne, 35-foot tall Martian Fighting Machine firing new and improved real flame heat rays at the audience and scanning them with its bug-like eyes (oh to have had rays like that when leaving the arena in the sub-zero temperatures).
The intense heat rays, blast winds, radiation, and ceaseless fires.
The Hiroshima bomb, nicknamed "Little Boy", unfurled a mix of shockwaves, heat rays and radiation, killing thousands instantly.
Tom Weathers is strongest of these new survivors: he can fly, he has superhuman strength, he can shoot heat rays from his hands--and he's involved in a righteous cause--any one.
It is now a popular arena show and comes to the NEC tonight complete with a 3D holograph of actor Richard Burton, Moody Blues lead singer Justin Hayward and a 10-metre-high Martian fighting machine firing heat rays into the audience.
The 747 was brought down by heat rays wielded by Martian invaders.
A freaky lightning storm puts a hole in the sidewalk and causes all electric devices to shut down (clocks, lights, cars), then suddenly the road starts to rumble, cracks appear and next thing you know the town's being torn apart and this huge tripod (very retro cool looking) is rising from underground and incinerating everyone (though oddly not melting metal) with its heat rays.
Decades ago, materials scientists discovered that heating vanadium dioxide above 68[degrees]C transforms it from a semiconductor that lets heat rays through to a more metallic substance that reflects them.
Invisible heat rays can burn and scar the retina at the back of the eye, which can cause blindness.
If enough heat rays are coming from the sun, then the solar panel [a 1,500-square-foot system] will automatically come up and heat to the desired, programmed temperature.