heart disease risk factor

heart disease risk factor

Etymology: AS, heorte, heart; L, dis + Fr, aise, ease, risquer, chance of injury; L, facere, to make
one of several hereditary, life-style, and environmental influences that increase one's chance of developing heart disease. Examples include cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol level, lack of routine exercise, and hereditary factors as signified by family history.
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The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD) analyzed the serum vitamin D levels and occurrence of headache in approximately 2,600 men aged between 42 and 60 years in 1984-1989.
The dietary habits of 1,032 men aged between 42 and 60 years and with no baseline diagnosis of a cardiovascular disease were assessed at the onset the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, KIHD, in 1984-1989 at the University of Eastern Finland.
Linemen are usually the largest members of a team, and they're getting bigger, now averaging more than 300 pounds--a heart disease risk factor in itself.
Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland looked at 2,000 men, as part of the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) study.
The study included 1,031 men participating in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor cohort.
Heart experts stress smoking is a major heart disease risk factor.
3 They're good for the heart as they contain folate, which lowers blood levels of homocysteine, a heart disease risk factor, plus potassium, which helps lower blood pressure.
Race is also a factor: African Americans have a greater incidence of heart disease than white Americans, largely because they tend to have higher average blood pressure levels, a heart disease risk factor.
To the Editor: Chronic infection of the coronary arteries by Chlamydia pneumoniae has been proposed as a heart disease risk factor (1).
In Finland's Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study of 1984-1986, a clear inverse association between vitamin C and blood pressure was found in a sample of 722 men, all 54 years old.
The participants were initially enrolled in the Finnish Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study between March 1, 1984 and December 31, 1989.
In addition to significantly improving LDL and total cholesterol, snacking on almonds instead of muffins also reduced central adiposity (belly fat), a wellestablished heart disease risk factor.