hearsay


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Related to hearsay: hearsay rule, hearsay evidence

hearsay

Statements overheard and repeated, rather than personally witnessed.

hearsay,

n 1. the testimony given by a witness who relates not what is known personally but what others have stated.
n 2. the evidence that does not derive its value solely from the credit of the witness, but rests mainly on the veracity and competency of other persons and is admitted in court only in specified cases, from necessity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sigal, lawyer for the defendant, claimed that both the satellite image on its own and the digitally added tack and coordinates were impermissible hearsay.
As part of this new program, advisors will be able to use the Hearsay Social Dashboard to:
Mr Brown said: "What I am suggesting to you is that, you can dress it up with all the supposed legal reasons in the world about it being comment, about it being inadmissible, hearsay evidence, or whatever, but the long and the short of it is that South Yorkshire Police would never have bothered with this entire exercise, conducted in a massive rush with lots of resources poured into it, unless the evidence that you were editing out was evidence that was damaging to the South Yorkshire Police.
While these are the ultimate practical worries, the bulk of the paper will be devoted to developing the epistemological argument that the inclusion of certain kinds of information, the prime example being hearsay, can lower the standards for what counts as knowledge, essentially making it too easy to justify attributions of knowledge.
Gary Liu, VP of marketing at Hearsay stated, It s exciting for us to see such activity in the marketplace .
But I refuse to be attacked by a bloke that knows very little about what goes on in the England set-up apart from rumour, until he was dropped, did not categorically deny the words attributed to him by hearsay.
803(23), (1) which is an exception to Florida's evidentiary statute governing hearsay.
The lower courts have uniformly held that Crawford does not apply to a defendant's own confession because such statements are defined by the Federal Rules of Evidence as "not hearsay," and Crawford applies only to "testimonial hearsay.
I]t is not entirely clear whether construction of a hearsay rule is a matter of discretion or a legal issue subject to de novo review.
7) The defendant claimed the introduction of victim's hearsay testimony violated his Sixth Amendment right to confront witnesses against him.
refused to testify and because her videotaped statement to a social services investigator constituted testimonial hearsay, admitting the videotape violated the defendant's constitutional right to cross-examine J.
Lord Justice Hughes continued: "The hearsay evidence of the complainant was strongly supported and did not stand as a bare, untestable allegation.