hearing-impaired


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Related to hearing-impaired: deafness, hearing loss, Profound hearing loss

hearing-impaired

(hîr′ĭng-ĭm-pârd′)
adj.
1. Having a diminished or defective sense of hearing, but not deaf; hard of hearing.
2. Completely incapable of hearing; deaf.
n. (used with a pl. verb)
Persons who are deficient in hearing or are deaf. Used with the: The hearing-impaired are provided with special services at school.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hearing-impaired people often "hear" by reading lips.
The following are suggestions to use when talking to a hearing-impaired person:
Classroom teachers' impressions of hearing-impaired and deaf children.
In particular, there's one which should greatly improve the communications process between the hearing-impaired and people with normal hearing.
Hearing-impaired students have the right to be made- aware of everything that is being communicated, and to be able to contribute ideas to the class.
Oralists or hearing-impaired individuals - persons with a hearing impairment who communicate primarily through speech 4.
For example, whenever possible, the hearing-impaired should try to hold conversations in areas with low background noise, restate what was heard to eliminate misunderstandings, and ask a speaker to rephrase a statement or spell out a word if it was not clear, even with repetition.
Counselor Wei-Lun Chen of Office for Disability Service, Student Counseling Division, expressed, "Many hearing-impaired students feel like outsiders in the classroom, suffering from loneliness and hopelessness, and can only participate in limited interaction with the outside world in their own fantasy world.
According to Orbos, studies showed that hearing-impaired individuals have a heightened sense of sight which is crucial in the MMDA's task of monitoring traffic flow and apprehending violators.
The aids were presented by club community service director Peter Makepeace, president Rodolphe Melki and other Rotarians to hearing-impaired youngsters Mahmood Mohammed, Adhnan Kassim, Ahlam Ali and Mohammed Jassim.
The lawsuit filed in June 2004 by GLAD and Lisa Aiello of Van Nuys alleged the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act and state law by failing to provide services such as teletype phones and enough visual information allowing equal access for the deaf and hearing-impaired.
Many hearing-impaired people have successfully trained as lipreading teachers.