hearing aid

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hearing

 [hēr´ing]
the sense by which sounds are perceived, or the capacity to perceive sound; sound waves are converted into nerve impulses for interpretation by the brain. The organ of hearing is the ear, which is divided into the outer, middle, and inner ear, each with its own role. Connecting the middle ear with the nasopharynx is the eustachian tube, through which air enters to equalize the pressure on both sides of the tympanic membrane (eardrum). Called also audition.
As sound is conducted from the external ear to the inner ear, the sound waves undergo considerable transformation. The tympanic membrane (eardrum), ossicles, and cochlea act as a mechanical transformer to concentrate the sound waves so that they can be picked up by nerve endings in the inner ear and transmitted to the brain.
hearing aid an instrument to amplify sounds for those with hearing loss. There are two types of electronic hearing aids: the air-conduction type, which is worn in the external acoustic meatus, and the bone-conduction type, which is worn in back of the ear over the mastoid process.

Those who have conductive hearing loss can often use any one of the better aids with good results. Patients with otosclerosis will probably need the bone-conduction type of instrument. Those with sensorineural hearing loss (caused by injury to the vestibulocochlear nerve), or a mixed type, may have more trouble selecting a suitable hearing aid and may get less satisfactory results.

Those wearing a hearing aid for the first time should have special training in its proper use. A hearing aid picks up and amplifies all sounds in the vicinity. Often a person whose hearing has declined gradually will have lost the facility to ignore background noises. When one first tries a hearing aid, one's ears will be assaulted by the sounds of passing cars, of doors slamming, of telephones ringing. Training in how to filter out these noises and concentrate on the essential is necessary if the person is to get good results from the hearing aid. For best results, this should be combined with lessons in lipreading.

A cochlear implant can help profoundly deaf persons recognize and interpret various sounds. It does not restore hearing but can improve the quality of life for the deaf.
Hearing aids. From Lammon et al., 1995.
hearing (omaha) in the omaha system, a client problem in the physiologic domain.

hear·ing aid

(hēr'ing ād),
An electronic device for amplifying sound to the ear; consisting of a microphone, amplifier, and receiver.
Synonym(s): hearing instrument

hearing aid

n.
A small electronic apparatus that amplifies sound and is worn in or behind the ear to compensate for impaired hearing.

hearing aid

an electronic device that amplifies sound used by people with impaired hearing. The device consists of a microphone, a battery power supply, an amplifier, and a receiver. The microphone receives sound waves directed toward the person with hearing loss, then converts the sound waves to electrical impulses that are amplified with the aid of the power supply, and the receiver converts the electrical impulses back into sound vibrations. Newer, programmable hearing aids can be customized on the basis of the characteristics of an individual's hearing loss.
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Hearing aid

hearing aid

Audiology A battery-powered electro-acoustic device that brings amplified sound to the ear to improve hearing, generally worn in the ear. See Hearing loss.

hear·ing aid

(hēr'ing ād)
An electronic amplifying device designed to bring sound more effectively into the ear; it consists of a microphone, amplifier, and receiver.
Synonym(s): hearing instrument.

hearing aid

Any device capable of increasing sound intensity at the ear, so as to assist the deaf. Electronic hearing aids traditionally consist of a microphone, an integrated circuit amplifier and an earpiece, often combined into a single device. Many include an electro-magnetic pickup for use in buildings or with telephones equipped with electro-magnetic sound radiation devices. Latest designs are intended for ear implantation and, instead of producing amplified sound from an earphone, apply output vibrations directly to the auditory ossicles, so eliminating feedback squeal. Amplification cannot relieve all cases of deafness.

hear·ing aid

(hēr'ing ād)
An electronic amplifying device designed to bring sound more effectively into the ear; it consists of a microphone, amplifier, and receiver.

hearing aid,

n an electronic device used to amplify and shape waves of sound entering the external auditory canal.
hearing aid, behind-the-ear,
n an electronic device, situated over the ear, for amplifying and shaping sound waves entering the external auditory canal.
hearing aid, eyeglass model,
n an electronic device, attached to the eyeglasses' thickened temple bar, for amplifying and shaping sound waves entering the external auditory canal.

hearing

the sense by which sounds are perceived, by conversion of sound waves into nerves impulses, which are then interpreted by the brain. Also, the capacity to perceive sound. The organ of hearing is the ear, which is divided into three sections, the outer, middle and inner ear. Each plays a special role in hearing. Connecting the middle ear with the nasopharynx is the pharyngotympanic canal, through which air enters to equalize the pressure on both sides of the tympanic membrane (eardrum).

hearing aid
an instrument to amplify sounds for the hard of hearing. These have been fitted to dogs, but are not normally offered in veterinary practice.
hearing tests
are difficult to administer and interpret in any other than laboratory-trained animals or without specialized electronic equipment such as an impedance audiometer or electroencephalograph with which auditory cortical evoked responses can be measured.
hearing dog
a dog trained to respond to sounds such as a telephone ring or door bell; used to assist hearing impaired humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
But) the good news is that most hearing loss can be restored with professional help and the proper hearing instrument.
A significant number of "nerve damage" respondents were told by medical professionals that hearing instruments would not help them.
On the development front, there has been an advent of wireless and waterproof hearing instruments among others.
Designed for binaural fitting and hearing, e2e wireless enables two independent hearing instruments to continuously share information about the listening environment and simultaneously synchronize the trend setting of each instrument's core digital-signal processing.
Placement close to the eardrum enables the fully automatic hearing instrument to use the natural acoustics of the ear to deliver a pleasing, transparent sound quality.
Included in the expanded portfolio are three new custom, in-the-ear (ITE), miniature hearing instruments that offer today's hearing aid wearers a guaranteed fit.
It is estimated that only 20 percent of people who could benefit from hearing instruments seek help, many often waiting up to ten years from the time they could benefit from hearing amplification.
Phoenix One offers single-channel compression and digital sound processing in an easy-to-use hearing instrument.
The Sweet Sounds of Life Contest encourages people to share, in 500 words or less, how a hearing instrument has impacted their lives, or the lives of loved ones in a positive way.
To better meet the needs of the community, Siemens has developed its new waterproof, dustproof and shock-resistant Aquaris hearing instrument.
The BTE provides patients with an adaptable hearing instrument solution should their hearing change over time.
MUSIC Pro is the only hearing instrument in its class equipped with Siemens VAD as a standard feature.

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