health fraud


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health fraud

A generic healthcare term for:
(1) Financial swindling in any form committed against a third-party payer of healthcare (43% of health fraud is in the form of services not rendered, 33% for fraudulent diagnoses); or
(2) Deceit for profit, including false representation of efficacy and concealment of adverse effects of medications or “natural curatives”.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

health fraud

A general term for those practices in which either
1. Health services are promised and/or paid for, but not provided at an appropriate standard of professionalism or skill. See Quackery or.
2. Practices in which health care is provided–or allegedly provided, but reimbursement claims to Medicare, Medicaid or other 3rd-party payer are fraudulent. See Medicare fraud.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rampant health fraud was a significant reason for passage of the 1906 Food and Drugs Act, says FDA historian John P.
Baratz, M.D., D.D.S., Ph.D., states that he is medical director of the South Shore Health Center, Inc., in Braintree, Mass.; assistant clinical professor of medicine, Boston University School of Medicine; and president, National Council Against Health Fraud, Inc.
Health fraud has also had a negative effect on the legitimate forms of alternative therapies that are practiced.
The inviting size of the booklet provides an excellent introduction to the issue of health fraud.
Baratz, a Boston-area internist and president of the National Council Against Health Fraud, does not see the value in fasting.
National Council Against Health Fraud: http:// www.ncahf.org Quackwatch: http://www.quackwatch.com
the National Council Against Health Fraud. For practitioners and researchers who visit this site, this concern will become quickly apparent, and perhaps reduce the credibility of the author's advice on other sites contained in her book.
Drawing on novels, cartoons, trade magazines, health fraud investigation records, newspapers, and manuals as well as close readings of print advertisements, de la Pena argues that mechanization and industrialization not only generated new modes of production, but also new experiences of the human body.
Unfortunately, many Americans do fall prey to this kind of quackery, particularly the elderly who tend to be targeted by the marketers of health fraud products and services.
Health fraud, relying on fraudulent claims of cures and false hopes to obtain money, has been around for centuries.
Don't be fooled by the term "natural" in health products--it doesn't make them any safer, warns Shelly Maifarth, health fraud coordinator for the FDA's Denver office.
BOTTOM LINE: For more information on AIDS treatment fraud, contact the Texas AIDS Health Fraud Network (800.758.5152 or www.tahfin.org).

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