health care rationing

health care rationing

The limitation of access to or the equitable distribution of medical services, through various gatekeeper controls. See Gatekeeper. Cf Coby Howard, Oregon plan, Rule of Rescue, 'Squeaky wheel. '.

health care ra·tion·ing

(helth kār rash'ŭn-ing)
nursing Planning for and implementing an equitable allocation or distribution of available health care resources.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have argued elsewhere that the need for health care rationing is inescapable, and that rationing decisions are more likely to be just and caring if they are self-imposed through a process of rational democratic deliberation.
national health expenditures (Kyusuk Chung), health care rationing (David Mechanic), and the regulation of health care markets (Robert I.
Identifying and eliminating regulatory and third-party payer policies and medical practices that usurp the "doctor-patient" relationship or deny pain care access to vulnerable groups or those policies that are primarily developed for cost savings that may supersede the best interest of patient care and serve as an inappropriate and unacceptable form of health care rationing.
Health care rationing would be the inevitable result.
It also explains why they equivocate about the truly controversial implications of an aging society, such as the pressures it creates for age-based health care rationing or the likelihood it brings of a more general "war between the generations" in the next century.
The two will present details of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), which they contend will lead to the demise of the insurance markets, increased costs and federal control of health care, and the potential for health care rationing.
We were looking forward to Congressional hearings to expose Berwick's views to the public and perhaps to impose at least some limits on his health care rationing plans by virtue of the process," Phillips emphasized.
Schmidt, "Models of Health Care Rationing," Current Sociology 52, no.
Health care rationing is the allocation of healthcare resources in the face of limited availability, which necessarily means that beneficial interventions are withheld from some individuals.
The stepwise rationing system is approved by the legislatures after recommendations from their health care rationing committees.
While the new law is being cheered for leading to certain patient protections and increased access, it is also being criticized for increasing deficits and taxes, and leading to health care rationing.
Princeton Professor Peter Singer, an open advocate of rationing of health care, invoked the above comment by President Obama in order to make his own point that politicians shouldn't be afraid to argue for health care rationing.

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