caries

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caries

 [kar´e-ēz, kar´ēz]
decay, as of bone or teeth. adj., adj ca´rious.
bottle mouth caries early childhood caries.
dental caries see dental caries.
dry caries (caries sic´ca) a form of tuberculous caries of the joints and ends of bones.
early childhood caries severe dental caries that are promoted by the sugars, acids, and sometimes Streptococcus mutans in a bottle of milk or juice left in contact with a child's primary teeth; this can also occur from contact with breast milk left in a sleeping child's mouth. The condition is preventable; no child should be permitted to fall asleep nursing on any liquid other than plain water. Called also bottle mouth caries.
recurrent caries dental caries beneath the margin of an existing tooth restoration.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·ies

(kār'ēz),
1. Microbial destruction or necrosis of teeth.
2. Obsolete term for tuberculosis of bones or joints.
[L. dry rot]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

caries

(kâr′ēz)
n.
1. Decay of a bone or tooth, especially dental caries.
2. (used with a pl. verb) Instances of such decay, especially dental cavities: a child with several caries.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

caries

Dentistry
Tooth decay. The destruction of tooth enamel and dentin, which is linked to infection by Streptococcus mutans and microaerophilic organisms that thrive when protected by a layer of hardened dental plaque; caries is most common in the young with refined carbohydrate-rich diets, especially in “snackers” who have increased oral pH; caries may affect older patients with diabetes, cancer or immunodeficient states.

Medical history
Obsolete for tuberculosis of bone and joints.
 
Orthopaedics
Osteolytic, softened and discoloured bone secondary to chronic periostitis and periperiosteitis, with formation of cold abscesses filled with a cheesy, fetid, pus-like substance, which extends through soft tissue to the surface via a sinus.
 
Vox populi
Cavities, cavity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

caries

Dentistry Cavity, tooth decay The destruction of tooth enamel and dentin, which is linked to infection by Streptococcus mutans and microaerophilic organisms that thrive when protected by a layer of hardened dental plaque; caries is most common in the young with refined carbohydrate-rich diets, especially in 'snackers' who have ↑ oral pH; caries may affect older Pts with DM, CA, or immunodeficiencies. See Fluoridation, Periodontal disease, Plaque, Tartar.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

car·ies

, pl. caries (kar'ēz)
Microbial destruction or necrosis of teeth.
[L. dry rot]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

caries

Decay of a tooth or a bone.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

caries

progressive decay of a bone or tooth. Dental caries is often caused by bacterial action on sugary foods and sweets, producing acids that destroy tooth enamel. fluoride in the water supply is protective.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Caries

The medical term for tooth decay.
Mentioned in: Tooth Decay
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·ies

, pl. caries (kar'ēz)
Microbial destruction or necrosis of teeth.
[L. dry rot]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about caries

Q. Can I treat dental Caries with antibiotics? I heard it’s a contagious disease, which means there are bacteria causing it. That means I can kill them by taking antibiotics no?

A. Your mouth has 500 different known bacteria in it. And a large amount of viruses and fungus. Taking antibiotics will not stop them from destroying your teeth. Maintaining good oral hygiene will, and with much less side effects…

Q. Dental Caries and Stress are related? Can it be possible that dental caries (cavities) be caused by stress? It seems to me that it can, because stress can cause all kinds of other health problems then why can't it also cause cavities. I have tried to find answers to question online, but have been unsuccessful. Sure would be great to know the answer to this.

A. if you understand the question "dental carries and stress are related?"

there are many factors that cause cavities ...

- poor hygiene
- poor diet
- malnutrition
- disease or illness
- and stress

it is well documented in the medical and alternative fields

Q. How do you differentiate between fluorosis and caries? Both appear as white spots on the teeth, so clinically how do you differentiate between them? I know it has something to do with their appearance while wet and dry, but I am not sure what? please help me I can't find this in any book.

A. Only mild fluorosis is seen as white stop lesion on the tooth. It usually comes with brown spots. Look for them. Another method is trying to stick a dental explorer into it (not the Microsoft one- it’ll only be a portal for viruses..) and because caries is demineralized area it will feel kind of sticky. But I wouldn’t do that…it can harm the teeth. Another way is by an x ray. Fluorosis- you will see it as a whiter spot. Caries- a more translucent spot.

More discussions about caries
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