head lice


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head lice

Pediculosis capitis Public health A louse transmitted in crowded conditions–eg, day care centers, homeless shelters Treatment Topical insecticides–permethrin, synergized pymethrin, malathion. See Crabs.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Sun: "The 2016 study of 48 US states found that head lice were able to grow gene mutations, which helped them resist insecticides, also known as pyrethrins, pyrethroids and permathrins."
Lotions and sprays don't prevent head lice and should only be used if a live louse has been found.
The head lice epidemic is a systemic problem that can only be dealt with as a community and by occasionally reducing prices or in this case offering Tax Day relief, we are doing our part to keep thousands of homes lice-free," says Arie Harel, President & CEO.
Traditional lice treatments don't work 98% of head lice are now immune to pesticide-based products.
Checking for lice 'Head lice prefer long hair': Lice don't care whether hair is short, long, clean or dirty.
Head lice are small parasites that live on the head between the hairs and survive there by sucking blood.
Sleeping in a bed formerly used by a person with head lice, for example, is unlikely to spread head lice; however, sharing a bed or spending extended periods of time with heads close together such as at a sleepover represents significant risk factors for transmission, providing lice with sufficient time to crawl from one head to the other, he says.
HOW CAN I TELL IF MY CHILD HAS HEAD LICE? "HEAD lice can appear at any place and any time, so there is no need to avoid certain situations, but just be vigilant and ensure that you check your child's hair regularly.
You don't this fancy peek once "A study by Hedrin found 87% of parents feel worry, panic or stress when they discover lice in their child's hair, but I would reassure parents that head lice are a common part of childhood and are easy to eliminate using the correct treatments.
treatment Ian Burgess, director of Medical Entomology Centre, Insect Research & Development Ltd, said: "The fact head lice are still with us in the UK is not due to the products not working, even though some are more effective than others, but because people often don't use them in a coordinated manner.
Head lice transmit from person to person directly during children's play or indirect through contact with lice carrying objects such as brushes combs, hats, clothing, billows and towels [9 and 10].
Parents begin to wonder: How did my child get head lice? Will it spread to the rest of my family?