headgear

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head·gear

(hed'gēr),
A removable extraoral appliance used as a source of traction to apply force to the teeth and jaws.

headgear

(hĕd′gîr′)
n.
An orthodontic brace extending around the head from one side of the mouth to the other, used to reposition the teeth or to restrict the growth of the upper jaw.

headgear

A generic term for a device worn on the head to minimise the effect of external forces.

head·gear

(hed'gēr)
Removable extraoral appliance used to apply force to teeth and jaws.
References in periodicals archive ?
I wouldn't be so skeptical of head covering if it applied to both men and women.
As she studied for her finals in the student lounge, she wore a black-lace head covering and a knee-length jean skirt over white tights.
"The policy is that head coverings for religious reasons, cultural reasons, economic reasons and medical reasons are all acceptable, as long as we can see the members full face," explained Tom Lyons, senior vice president for security for the credit union.
For many years, my mother's head covering had been difficult for me to accept.
* Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat made the kaffiyeh head covering famous.
* For women: lace commode, head covering with stiff ruffles, lace apron front, and large and heavy train on skirt
The same should be done for police service a nimals, especially supplementing the vest with some type of head covering or helmet device to protect the dog's most vulnerable target zone.
Usually at the end of a year he receives his ryassa (habit) and kamalavka (head covering).
There is a difference between head covering of the muhajaba (a woman who consciously wears the head covering to signify religiosity) and a mu 'adabah (polite and modest woman) whose head covering connotes only respectability.
His office released a report written four years ago that showed a poll had found that half (49.8 percent) of Iranians, both male and female, opposed making head covering mandatory.
Amasa, a graduate of the University of Ilorin and an indigene of Kwara State, was not called to bar by the Nigerian Law School for her insistence on wearing a head covering (hijab) during the induction ceremony on December 13, 2017, in Abuja.
Police in Long Beach, California, have reversed their policy on barring prisoners from wearing any religious head covering while in custody.