haze


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haze

In ophthalmology, a clouding of vision that makes viewed objects appear smoky or indistinct. Opacification of the cornea is the cause.
References in classic literature ?
At intervals a couple would approach the doorway for air, and the haze no longer veiling their features, the demigods resolved themselves into the homely personalities of her own next-door neighbours.
She was the thing we call romance, which lives in the little hut beyond the blue haze of the pine-woods.
There was a slight haze upon the ocean which had cut off our view of the stars; but conditions all pointed toward a clear morrow, and I was on deck anxiously awaiting the rising of the sun.
I think," said Anne softly, "that `the land where dreams come true' is in the blue haze yonder, over that little valley.
In the distance, detail was veiled and blurred by a purple haze, but behind this purple haze, he knew, was the glamour of the unknown, the lure of romance.
It was one of those rare afternoons when all the thickness and shadow of London are changed to a kind of shining, pulsing, special atmosphere; when the smoky vapors become fluttering golden clouds, nacreous veils of pink and amber; when all that bleakness of gray stone and dullness of dirty brick trembles in aureate light, and all the roofs and spires, and one great dome, are floated in golden haze.
Mag, yer a bloomin' good-looker," he remarked, studying her face through the haze.
Two or three farmhouses were visible through the haze, but in none of them, naturally, was a light.
On the left the low-lying land stretched in a dim haze, rising here and there into a darker blur which marked the higher capes and headlands.
Besides, there was no glamour about them, no haze of romance, no promise of adventure.
The little fishing village, nestled in the cove where the sand-dunes met the harbor shore, looked like a great opal in the haze.
On the death of his father, Ralph Nickleby, who had been some time before placed in a mercantile house in London, applied himself passionately to his old pursuit of money-getting, in which he speedily became so buried and absorbed, that he quite forgot his brother for many years; and if, at times, a recollection of his old playfellow broke upon him through the haze in which he lived--for gold conjures up a mist about a man, more destructive of all his old senses and lulling to his feelings than the fumes of charcoal--it brought along with it a companion thought, that if they were intimate he would want to borrow money of him.