hashitoxicosis

hashitoxicosis

 [hash″ĭ-tok″sĭ-ko´sis]
excessive functional activity of the thyroid gland in patients withhashimoto's disease, in whom decreased thyroid function would ordinarily be expected.

hashitoxicosis

Hashimoto's thyroiditis–chronic autoimmune thyroiditis presenting as hyperthyroidism
References in periodicals archive ?
The thyrotoxic phase of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (hashitoxicosis) was defined as thyrotoxicosis with the presence of at least one of the anti-TPO or anti-Tg antibodies (based on the reference range of locally used commercial kits) in patients without any other cause.
Patients with GD or hashitoxicosis have been analyzed in greater detail.
Of the 503 patients who were included in the study, 375 (74.6%) were diagnosed with GD and 75 (14.9%) patients had hashitoxicosis. The diagnosis in the remaining patients were thyroid hormone receptor-beta mutation in 22 (4.4%), subacute thyroiditis in four (0.8%), toxic nodular goiter in four (0.8%), neonatal GD in three (0.6%), papillary thyroid carcinoma in two (0.4%) and 18 patients (3.6%) who were not assigned a specific diagnosis.
The most common reported presenting complaints among patients with GD or hashitoxicosis were tachycardia and/or palpitations, weight loss and excessive sweating.
This can be explained by the fact that hashitoxicosis is a transient hyperthyroid phase of HT.
These autoantibodies were undetectable and we ruled out the diagnosis of Graves' disease and hashitoxicosis. The lack of neck pain and the normality of acute inflammation parameters (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and PCR) allowed us to exclude the diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis.
Lu, "Febrile Hashimoto's encephalopathy associated with Hashitoxicosis," Acta Neurologica Belgica, vol.
Tambien se detectan, en pequena proporcion, anticuerpos contra el receptor del TSH de tipo estimulatorio, observandose clinica de hipertiroidismo (Hashitoxicosis).
Hashitoxicosis is a transient hyper thyroid phase of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.
However, 10% of all cases are seen in patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism, either Hashimoto's thyroiditis Hashitoxicosis or atrophic thyroiditis.
Occasionally, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor blocking antibodies can be responsible of an atrophic form of AT; more rarely, anti-TSH receptor stimulating antibodies can cause a transient form of hyperthyroidism (hashitoxicosis) [20].
These patients may go into Hashitoxicosis after supplementing with iodine, exhibiting hyperthyroid symptoms possibly requiring hospitalization for thyroid storm.