hepatoscopy

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hepatoscopy

 [hep″ah-tos´kah-pe]
examination of the liver.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hep·a·tos·co·py

(hep'ă-tos'kŏ-pē),
Examination of the liver.
[hepato- + G. skopeō, to examine]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hepatoscopy

(hĕp′ə-tŏs′kə-pē)
n.
Examination of the liver.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hepatoscopy

Ethnomedicine
Haruspicy, hepatomancy—A religious practice among the ancient Hitites and Babylonions in which the liver, entrails or other organ of a sacrificed sheep or poultry was “read” to divine the future.
 
Medspeak
A nonspecific term for any modality used to examine the liver, including laparoscopy, open surgical exploration and imaging.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

hep·a·tos·co·py

(hep'ă-tos'kŏ-pē)
Examination of the liver.
[hepato- + G. skopeō, to examine]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Haruspex: At first they were doing quite well, breeding like lawyers.
(75.) For example, in SAA 10 179 the haruspex Kudurru explains to Esarhaddon that, under duress, he had performed a fraudulent extispicy.
To take quite a different example, the curious vestiture of the Etruscan haruspex, whose raison d'etre was to mediate between humans and gods, was that of a shepherd.
In Egypt, dream divination fell to the priests, who were acquainted with a number of mantic and divinatory arts, and in Mesopotamia, the same titles that appear for oneiromantics also occur in reference to the haruspex, augur, and practitioners of a variety of other divinatory disciplines.
159) from Uruk establishes "correspondences between the liver examined by the haruspex and the heliacal risings of constellations." [42] Reiner also points out the dependence of magical practices on astrology, as reflected by texts such as BRMIV nos.
He also mentions the haruspex Issu-arik in "MVN 4, 262" and TCL 5, 5559.