harpoon

(redirected from harpooner)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

har·poon

(har-pūn'),
A small, sharp-pointed instrument with a barbed head used for extracting bits of tissue for microscopic examination.

harpoon

(hăr-poon′) [Gr. harpazein, to seize]
A device with a hook on one end for obtaining small pieces of tissue such as muscle for examination.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Arctic harpooner: A voyage on the schooner Abbie Bradford 1878-1879.
Titus was a well-known and very much respected beluga whale hunter; a dedicated Beluga Harvest Monitor and proficient whale sampler; the harpooner on the Aklavik Hunters and Trappers Committee's (HTC) bowhead whale hunt in 1991; and the Captain of the HTC's successful bowhead hunt in 1996.
In Tonga he sees the Polynesians hunt the great whales with hand harpoons and listens to the stories of a retired harpooner turned Wesleyan lay preacher.
Winter 1690 "Cape Cod "Large." Harbour" Winter 1691 Cape Cod 1692 Edgartown "Cast on shore"; supposedly killed by a harpooner, "on a whale design." 1697 Yarmouth Mother 55 ft and calf 20 ft.
Aleksei forces the 40 horsepower motor to its maximum and Patron, the harpooner, prepares to cast.
Melville describes the fabled harpooner who, like Conrad later on, left his normal berth "to go in a trading ship on a voyage to Africa, went ashore there, joined a discovery party and penetrated far into the interior, where he traveled for a period of nearly two years, often endangered by serpents, savages, tigers [sic], poisonous miasmas, with all the other common perils incidental to wandering in the heart of unknown regions" (247).
Steve Weiner, a 50-year harpooner out of Ogunquit, Maine, said he remains concerned about bluefin health on both sides of the Atlantic.
In 1603, a group of Inuit confronted and slew Domingo de Alascoaga, the captain and harpooner on the Maria of Saint-Vincent de Ziburu (Ciboure).
"We have a professional approach and therefore we don't think about it," Dag Myklebust, the captain and harpooner on the whaling ship Kato, told NRK, adding that pregnancy is a plus because it's "a sign of good health."
Harpooner said that the whale "dove differently"--likely compromised by chronic injury.
Too deep and the harpooner must rely on those on the rods to crank the gator to the surface and drive the arrowhead through that tough hide.
(136) The book's narrator praises Captain Scorseby as the supreme exemplar of the "harpooner and whaleman," the "best existing authority" on the Greenland (Right) [Bowhead] whale; the narrator's only criticism of Scoresby is his ignorance that "the great sperm whale now reigneth!," not the "Greenland or right-whale." (137)