hare

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hare

see lepus.

calling hare
see pika.
hare fibroma
a poxvirus disease of hares, caused by a leporipoxvirus, characterized by the formation of fibromas.
References in classic literature ?
This call and the uplifted whip meant that he saw a sitting hare.
he thought as he rode with "Uncle" and Ilagin toward the hare.
The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
They have lost the scent," said the old horse; "perhaps the hare will get off.
Now we shall see the hare," said my mother; and just then a hare wild with fright rushed by and made for the woods.
Well, no," she said, "you must not say that; but though I am an old horse, and have seen and heard a great deal, I never yet could make out why men are so fond of this sport; they often hurt themselves, often spoil good horses, and tear up the fields, and all for a hare or a fox, or a stag, that they could get more easily some other way; but we are only horses, and don't know.
The higgler to whom the hare was sold, being unfortunately taken many months after with a quantity of game upon him, was obliged to make his peace with the squire, by becoming evidence against some poacher.
This last straight two miles and a half is always a vantage ground for the hounds, and the hares know it well; they are generally viewed on the side of Barby Hill, and all eyes are on the lookout for them to-day.
Your worship's a strange man," said Sancho; "let's take it for granted that this hare is Dulcinea, and these greyhounds chasing it the malignant enchanters who turned her into a country wench; she flies, and I catch her and put her into your worship's hands, and you hold her in your arms and cherish her; what bad sign is that, or what ill omen is there to be found here?
The two boys who had been quarrelling came over to look at the hare, and Sancho asked one of them what their quarrel was about.
The sportsmen came up and asked for their hare, which Don Quixote gave them.
The Prince drew his bow once more, and the hare lay dead at his feet; but at the same moment a dove rose up in the air, and circled round the Prince's head in the most confiding manner.