hardness test


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hardness test

A test designed to determine the relative hardness of materials by correlating the size or depth of an indent produced by a particular instrument with a known amount of compressive force.
See: hardness number

hard·ness test

(hahrd'nĕs test)
Measurement of durability of a material, usually involving making and measuring an indentation in the material using a pressure device.
See also: Brinell hardness test, Rockwell hardness test, Vickers hardness test, Knoop hardness test
References in periodicals archive ?
Glass hardness tests use a Knoop indenter at very low loads ([approximately equal to]1 N) and consequently make very small, shallow impressions.
Currently one of the most efficient and rapid methods for characterizing advanced materials in terms of important characteristics is the Martens hardness test. This kind of hardness of a loading-unloading indenter cycle, cycle lasts 120 seconds, can cause a number of important mechanical properties, such as Martens hardness, elastic modulus, mechanical work of elastic deformation, mechanical work of plastic deformation, mechanical work of total deformation, tend to creep, tendency to hardening and the degree of hardening.
This is caused by non-ideal conditions of the hardness test (Mendes et al., 2003).
Figure 1 presents schematically the geometric characteristics of Martens hardness test and in figure 1b a trace of test on cadmium telluride after indenter removal is shown.
b) For impact load tests the port penetrator 9 together with the spherical tungsten carbide penetrator 10 corresponding to the test type is tapped to the guiding rod 6, then the hardness test type is electronically set, and the switches [K.sub.1] and [K.sub.2] are automatically off , fact that leads to the battery charging of condensers [C.sub.o], afterwards the switch [K.sub.1] is also automatically on whereas the switch [K.sub.3] is off, fact that makes the battery of condensers discharge through coil 4 by an electric energy [E.sub.e]:
Several castings outside of the acceptable Brinell hardness range are necessary to establish a correlation because the standard error in the Brinell hardness test is significantly large when compared with the usual hardness acceptance range for most gray iron castings.
The principles is similar to the Brinell hardness test for metals.