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hard

adjective Indurated; firm.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is said that a hard-boiled egg tastes best when done right.
You are going to need hard-boiled or blown eggs, glitter, white glue, and empty bowls
PLOUGHMAN'S LUNCH SP Cooked skinless chicken legs, pickled onions, gherkins, halved hard-boiled eggs, cucumber, carrot and pepper sticks, cherry tomatoes and an apple.
The game consisting of two red-coloured hard-boiled eggs also adorned with the Swiss cross will also come with instructions and Aromat seasoning to make it not just enjoyable but tasty as well.
Grab a black sharpie marker and doodle or draw some simple patterns on the hard-boiled eggs.
Usually considered among the works of hard-boiled American fiction produced in the period, Serenade departs dramatically from the conventions of its genre by having at its centre a protagonist, John Howard Sharp, who is both a prototypical tough-guy and, bizarrely, a down-and-out opera singer who loses his singing voice as a result of a homoerotic attraction to his gay conductor and mentor Winston Hawes.
John Paul Athanasourelis's Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe: The Hard-Boiled Detective Transformed examines Chandler's detective with relation to his place in the hard-boiled literary tradition.
Cut the hard-boiled eggs into halves or quarters, then season with salt and pepper.
THE DEPARTED (2006) Martin Scorsese finally won an Oscar for this hard-boiled thriller.
Leonard Cassuto s Hard-Boiled Sentimentality: The Secret History of American Crime Stories answers this question by identifying sentimentality as the buried topos of the crime novel and by implication its descendant, the television crime serial.
Lunch: Salad Nicoise (a tin of tuna or a tuna steak on a bed of salad - hard boiled eggs and anchovies are optional); natural live yoghurt Dinner: Chicken and stir-fry vegetables and brown rice Snacks (if needed): Natural live yoghurt, vegetable crudits, hard-boiled eggs, extra meat or fish
The traditional hard-boiled hero or antihero of American crime fiction beginning in the 1920s, customarily a detective, almost always displayed elements of both gender models.