hapten

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hapten

 [hap´ten]
a small molecule, not antigenic by itself, that can react with specific antibodies and elicit the formation of such antibodies when conjugated to a larger antigenic molecule, usually a protein, called in this context the carrier. Antibody production involves activation of B lymphocytes by the hapten and helper T cells by the carrier.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hap·ten

(hap'-ten),
A molecule that is incapable, by itself, of causing a cell-mediated or humoral immune response but can, however, combine with a larger antigenic molecule called a carrier. A hapten-carrier complex can stimulate antibody production and reactive T-cells.
See also: hapten inhibition of precipitation.
[G. haptō, to fasten, bind]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hapten

(hăp′tĕn′) also

haptene

(-tēn′)
n.
A small molecule that reacts with a specific antibody but cannot induce the formation of antibodies unless bound to a carrier protein or other large antigenic molecule.

hap·ten′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hap·ten

(hap'tĕn)
A molecule that is incapable, alone, of causing the production of antibodies but can, however, combine with a larger antigenic molecule called a carrier.
Synonym(s): incomplete antigen, partial antigen.
[G. haptō, to fasten, + -en, noun suffix]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hapten

An incomplete antigen that cannot, by itself, promote antibody formation but that can do so when conjugated to a protein. Most haptens are organic substances of low molecular weight. From the Greek haptein , to fasten.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

hapten

a substance that is able to combine with specific antibodies but does not produce them unless attached to a large CARRIER MOLECULE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

hap·ten

(hap'tĕn)
A molecule that is incapable, alone, of causing the production of antibodies but can, however, combine with a larger antigenic molecule called a carrier.
Synonym(s): incomplete antigen, partial antigen.
[G. haptō, to fasten, + -en, noun suffix]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, in some hereditarily predisposed individuals, TMs may act as haptenic immune reactors.
Each of these HSA-conjugates was evaluated with the TNBS reagent and found to contain a minimum of 17 haptenic moieties per molecule HSA.
Immobilization of small haptenic molecules and steroid molecules such as 25(OH)[D.sub.3], which bind only weakly, or not at all, by simple physical adsorption, involves coupling to a carrier or covalent coupling.