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haploid

 [hap´loid]
having half the number of chromosomes characteristically found in the somatic (diploid) cells of an organism; typical of the gametes of a species whose union restores the diploid number.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hap·loid

(hap'loyd),
Denoting the number of chromosomes in sperm or ova, which is half the number in somatic (diploid) cells; the haploid number in normal human beings is 23.
Synonym(s): monoploid
[G. haplos, simple, + eidos, appearance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

haploid

(hăp′loid′)
adj.
Having a single set of unpaired chromosomes, as in a germ cell, such as an egg or sperm, or in a moss plant or a drone bee.
n.
An organism having haploid cells.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

haploid

Genetics adjective Referring to:
1. A normal chromosome complement–expressed as n.
2. A cell with only one copy of each chromosome type–ie, half the number of chromosomes present in other cells; gametes–ie, sperm and ova are haploid. See Chromosome, Diploid, Polypoid, Prokaryote.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hap·loid

(hap'loyd)
Denoting the number of chromosomes in sperm or an oocyte, which is half the number in somatic (diploid) cells; the haploid number in normal human beings is 23.
[G. haplos, simple, + eidos, appearance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

haploid

Having half the number of chromosomes present in a normal body cell. The germ cells, the sperms and eggs (ova) are haploid, so that, on fusion, the full (DIPLOID) number is made up. From the Greek haploeides , single.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

haploid

  1. (of a cell nucleus) containing one of each type of chromosome.
  2. a haploid organism in which the main life stage has cell nuclei with one of each type of chromosome, written as ‘n’. Such organisms (e.g. fungi, many algae) usually have a brief DIPLOID (2) phase (2n), returning to the haploid state via MEIOSIS. See ALTERNATION OF GENERATIONS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
& Mascia, P.N., Two regeneration systems for the production of haploid plants from wheat anther culture.
In present research four locally developed inducer lines were collected from Maize Research Station, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan to produce maternal haploids. These inducer lines were:
Induction of haploid plants from isolated pollen of B.
In contrast, none of the haploid gynogenetic brown trout embryos survived up to the hatching stage.
Apparently, haploid and double haploid shoot production occur as a result of organogenesis from an initial proliferation of callus and not via androgenesis [7].
Na cevada, a cultura de anteras e uma das mais eficientes tecnicas para obtencao de haploides e duplo-haploides e varios estudos sugerem que alguns fatores geneticos parecem estar envolvidos na capacidade de producao de plantas duplo-haploide (FAROUGHI-WEHR et al., 1982; LARSEN et al., 1991; WIETHOLTER et al., 2008).
As opposed to the low frequency reported for wild type maize plants (see above), Kermicle observed a high incidence (up to ~3%) of spontaneous male-derived, androgenic haploids in a mutant inbred line carrying a mutant allele of the indeterminate gametophytel (ig1) gene.
The main objective of this research was investigation of growth regulators and illumination condition effects on induction and optimum olive conservolea callus and it's evaluation for usable haploid plantlet regeneration in olive breeding program.
The percentage of haploid and subaneuploid (chromosome number less than 16) increased steadily and reached 100% by 50 sec UV irradiation.
Microscopic and cytological evidence from the species examined to date suggests that dinoflagellates (with the exception of Noctiluca spp.) possess a vegetative haploid nuclear phase (Pfiester and Anderson, 1987; Coats, 2002).
Among many ants, bees, wasps, mites, and thrips, for example, unfertilized eggs develop into haploid males, which have just one set of chromosomes.
In the present experiment, the species studied was Alexamdrium minutum [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 1 OMITTED] (Halim) Balech, which is a haploid dinoflagellate species that usually reproduces asexually, although under certain circumstances two cells can conjugate, thus producing a diploid zygote.