handedness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

handedness

 [hand´ed-nes]
the preferential use of the hand of one side in all voluntary motor acts; see also dextrality and sinistrality.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nes), [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Chemistry The left- or right-sidedness, or asymmetry of virtually everything in the universe from the ‘lowly’ molecule to highly complex organisms
Neurology A state of dominance of use of a preferred side, as in left-handed or right-handed
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs)
Preference for the use of one hand, most commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

handedness

The natural tendency to use one hand rather than the other for skilled manual tasks such as writing. Ambidexterity-the indifferent use of either hand-is rare. About 10% of people are left-handed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs) [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The common people around the left-handers have little information about them and sometimes their special needs related to handedness are not fully understood.
E., REIVICH, M., 1982, Sex and handedness differences in cerebral blood flow during rest and cognitive activity.
Norton (2000), for instance, has gathered new evidence on the link between left handedness and intellectual creativity.
Although most handedness research has investigated left versus right-handedness, some studies have found that mixed-handedness, defined as being comfortable using either the left or right hand depending upon the task, also reflects important individual differences.
Though much emphasis has been given to handedness, few studies have investigated footedness (34) and eyedness (4,33,35,36) too.
In both MANOVA and ANCOVA (age as covariate) using handedness and disability group as factors, the main effects for handedness were less apparent.
We questioned the parents of the young children about their own handedness, considering that heredity may play a factor.
The subgroup approach to handedness contrasts with that of laterality quotients (Briggs & Nebes, 1975; Crovitz & Zener, 1962; Oldfield, 1971; Steenhuis, Bryden, Schwartz, & Lawson, 1990).
As a message to people on International Left-handers' Day, Dr Jaju says, "Handedness is natural, whether left or right.
Handedness, whether it is right- or left-handed, is set early in foetal life and is at least partially determined by genetics.
He told the police officials that no high handedness with any citizen would be tolerated.