hamular


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ham·u·lar

(ham'yū-lăr),
Hook-shaped; unciform.
[L. hamulus, q.v.]

ham·u·lar

(ham'yū-lăr)
Hook-shaped; unciform.
[L. hamulus, q.v.]
References in periodicals archive ?
There are several signs and symptoms of bursitis of the hamular process.
Sharp localised pain in the hamular region and elongated hamuli will be evident as a firm swelling or enlargement under the mucosa of the soft palate on palpation
Bursitis pain is varied: earache, otic fullness, dys- phagia, odynophagia, gustative hyperesthesia, hamular and soft palate pain, sore throat, jaw pain, toothache, burning and pricking dysaesthesias, retroorbital pain, headaches and hypoesthesia.
Hamular process palpation is made by oral access, manually (Fig 1) or with a blunt instrument in a careful manner reaching the posterior and medial zone of the maxillary tuberosity.
TABLE 1: ENLISTS THE VARIOUS DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSES FOR HAMULAR BURSITIS
The diagnosis of hamular process bursitis should be based on the reported history, physical examination findings, and the success of the diagnostic anaesthetic infiltration into the hamular region.
Infiltration of local anaesthesia can be an excellent diagnostic aid when differentiating hamular pain from other possible causes.
Radiographs of the hamulus and pterygomaxillary region should be obtained to determine whether the hamulus is fractured, whether an osteophyte is present on the hamular process producing inflammation of the bursa, or for any other abnormal findings.
Infiltration of local anaesthesia (LA) to the hamular base and comparison of clinical findings in the left and right sides are most important when arriving at a diagnosis.
The hamular zone deserves special clinical atten- tion especially in the differential diagnosis of the wide variety of craniocervical pains.
Thereby, ruling out these entities makes the diagnosis of hamular bursitis much less complicated.