hamstrings


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

hamstrings

The tendons of the three long, spindle-shaped muscles at the back of the thigh (the hams). These prominent tendons can be felt at the back of the knee on either side.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a pulled hamstring is a common sports injury and will resolve with time and correct rehabilitation, certain types of tear are much more serious and disabling and, if left untreated, can result in long-term problems.
One common problem that causes hamstring injuries is trying to stretch or do a strenuous exercise without properly warming it up, such as in yoga, Zumba, running, or squatting.
This isn't the first time Paul has been bothered hamstring issues.
The same sequence is applied for the next dynamic technique in which the subject is asked to actively extend his leg, so that reciprocal inhibition of the hamstrings can be achieved.
"The quads, hip flexors and groin muscles on the opposite leg play a big role in how much work the hamstrings have to do.
All the participants showed signs of hamstring healing with many having early scar tissue formation at the time of return-to-sport.
Derby hope midfielder Craig Bryson can recover from a groin injury, but striker Jamie Ward and right-back John Brayford both have hamstring issues.
Understanding the biomechanical factors of hamstring injury are crucial for the development of preventative strategies.
"In orde individua incorpo methods practic have th proves needs ac practiti and ind er als orate s ce, he s it the Elliott said: "I really expected to find a huge amount of research material in this area, as hamstring injuries are so common and there are a number of different methods currently used to help prev injury.
"Sometimes when you haven't played for a while there's a possibility of your hamstrings being tight.
According to Boyd Bender, a physical therapist for Pacific Northwest Ballet, the correct strength ratio of quads to hamstrings in dancers is generally about 60/40.
HIP EXTENSION AND HAMSTRING CURL (PHOTOS 5 & 6):