hamstring muscles


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to hamstring muscles: Quadriceps muscles

ham·string mus·cles

the muscles at the back of the thigh, comprising the long head of biceps, the semitendinosus, and the semimembranosus muscles; hamstring muscles ariose from ischial tuberosity, act across both hip and knee joints, and are innervated by the tibial nerve.
The muscles of the posterior thigh, which consist of biceps femoris—laterally, and the semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles—medially

hamstring muscles

The three large muscles on the back of the thigh-the semimembranosus, the semitendinosus and the biceps femoris. These muscles arise from the lower back part of the pelvis and are inserted, by way of the HAMSTRINGS, into the back of the bone of the lower leg (the TIBIA). Contraction of the hamstring muscles bends the knee and straightens the hip joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants were then randomly assigned into one of the three groups and performed only the test specific for each group for hamstring muscle strength (RT and RTC) or knee flexion and extension frequency (HVT).
When the specific area of tightness of hamstring muscle is located, the further treatment is limited to this target area.
The effect of time on static stretch on the flexibility of the hamstring muscles.
Hamstring muscle strain treated by mobilizing the sacroiliac joint.
7) The study suggested the possible hypothesis that hamstring muscle act as postural control of sub-occipital muscles.
Three muscles that are known collectively as the hamstring muscle cover the posterior thigh consisting of the semitendinosus, the semimembranosus, and the biceps femoris muscles that have a tendency to get shorten.
Bandy WD, Irion JM (1994) The effect of time on static stretch on the flexibility of the hamstring muscles.
A statistically significant difference was determined between the overt hypothyroidism and control groups and between the subclinical hypothyroidism and control groups in terms of isokinetic peak torque values of the hamstring muscle at angular velocities of 60[degrees]/s and 180[degrees]/s (p=0.
We showed that over 3 h of stimulation in this protocol (1:4 s), participants' gluteal and hamstring muscles kept contracting without marked muscle fatigue.
Some report almost full recovery of knee flexor strength, possibly through hypertrophy of the other hamstring muscles.
These include exercise to strengthen and lengthen the hamstring muscles, spinal manual therapy, massage, proprioceptive balance training and plyometrics - although current evidence for the use of these techniques can neither be supported or refuted.