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malleus

 [mal´e-us]
the outermost and largest of the three ossicles of the ear; called also hammer. See also color plates.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mal·le·us

, gen. and pl.

mal·le·i

(mal'ē-ŭs, mal'ē-ī), [TA]
The largest of the three auditory ossicles, resembling a club rather than a hammer; it is regarded as having a head, below which is the neck, and from this diverge the handle or manubrium, and the slender, anterior process; from the base of the manubrium the short lateral process arises. The manubrium and lateral process are firmly attached to the tympanic membrane, and the head articulates with a saddle-shaped surface on the body of the incus.
Synonym(s): hammer
[L. a hammer]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hammer

(hăm′ər)
n.
Anatomy See malleus.

ham′mer·er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mal·le·us

, pl. mallei (mal'ē-ŭs, -ī) [TA]
The largest of the three auditory ossicles, resembling a club rather than a hammer; it is regarded as having a head, below which is the neck, and from this diverge the handle or manubrium, and the slender, anterior process; from the base of the manubrium the short lateral process arises. The manubrium and lateral process are firmly attached to the tympanic membrane, and the head articulates with a saddle-shaped surface on the body of the incus.
Synonym(s): hammer.
[L. a hammer]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hammer

see MALLEUS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Religion News Service, ICES hammers away at environmentalists for their "faulty science and economics, strident street theater, and demands for immediate, drastic action on problems that are often hypothetical or overstated." Rabbi Lapin, a declaration signer, sums it up by saying, "When we embrace the strident messages of radical environmentalism, we are neither just, nor merciful, nor good stewards of the Earth, and we condemn the world's poorest people to continued misery and disease.
In one of the great panoramic set pieces of the English language--the famous chapter from his History on the condition of England in 1685--Macaulay sets out to cure the reader of any notion that the olden times were better: For page upon page he hammers away at the miserableness of the food, the lodgings, the roads, the communications, the sanitation; the badness of governance; the insecurity of person and property; the prevalence of disorder and crime.
The referee felt the pale blue Hammers away kit clashed with the sleeves of Villa's home shirt.