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malleus

 [mal´e-us]
the outermost and largest of the three ossicles of the ear; called also hammer. See also color plates.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mal·le·us

, gen. and pl.

mal·le·i

(mal'ē-ŭs, mal'ē-ī), [TA]
The largest of the three auditory ossicles, resembling a club rather than a hammer; it is regarded as having a head, below which is the neck, and from this diverge the handle or manubrium, and the slender, anterior process; from the base of the manubrium the short lateral process arises. The manubrium and lateral process are firmly attached to the tympanic membrane, and the head articulates with a saddle-shaped surface on the body of the incus.
Synonym(s): hammer
[L. a hammer]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hammer

(hăm′ər)
n.
Anatomy See malleus.

ham′mer·er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mal·le·us

, pl. mallei (mal'ē-ŭs, -ī) [TA]
The largest of the three auditory ossicles, resembling a club rather than a hammer; it is regarded as having a head, below which is the neck, and from this diverge the handle or manubrium, and the slender, anterior process; from the base of the manubrium the short lateral process arises. The manubrium and lateral process are firmly attached to the tympanic membrane, and the head articulates with a saddle-shaped surface on the body of the incus.
Synonym(s): hammer.
[L. a hammer]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hammer

see MALLEUS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in classic literature ?
"I think no thing of flesh held that hammer," said the blacksmith in a stifled voice; "mortally speaking, I think the man died alone."
"Do you mean to say, Barnes," came the sharp voice of the cobbler, "that the hammer jumped up of itself and knocked the man down?"
"Do you remember the blacksmith, though he believes in miracles, talking scornfully of the impossible fairy tale that his hammer had wings and flew half a mile across country?"
When you left your brother you were racked with no unrighteous rage, to the extent even that you snatched up a small hammer, half inclined to kill him with his foulness on his mouth.
A FIRM has been fined after dangerous hammers were found on sale at a Coventry store.
The height of Keats's narrative comes at the point where John Henry, sensing victory is close at hand, grabs two twenty-pound hammers:
Also omitted is the most important letterLenin wrote about the Hammers, to Stalin and the rest of the Politburo, on May 24, 1922.
Says the patron: "That must be the same outfitthat sells hammers to the Pentagon.'
Hammer drills and rotary hammers (also called rotary hammer drills) both produce a pounding force that makes them extremely efficient at blasting through masonry.
Boart Longyear is launching the BLH series of down-the-hole (DTH) hammers and bits.