HAMLET


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HAMLET

(ham'lit),
Acronym for human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells.
See also: lactalbumin.

HAMLET

Acronym for human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells. See ALPHA-LACTALBUMIN.
References in periodicals archive ?
One reads of Lessing's crucial importance in the "Shakespeare wars"; of Kant's flirtations with the thought of Swedenborg; of Hegel as a critical Aeneas; of Schopenhauer as Ariel (to Kant's Prospero and Hegel's Caliban); of Gustaf Gruendgens's 1936 Berlin performance of Hamlet in a blond wig; of Jose Benardete's suggestion of a Quinean poetics; and, perhaps, most intriguingly, of Russell's obsession with Hamlet, crystallized neatly in a 1918 remark from prison: "I shall never lose the sense of being a ghost.
In contrast, Margreta de Grazia argues that Hamlet, the "icon of consciousness," has been mis-read and over-stated within the context of the overall play.
The role is often picked apart as a series of contradictory character studies - Hamlet the nihilist; Hamlet the psycho; Hamlet the jester and friend; and, finally, Hamlet the avenger.
The charms of Hamlet's mind are essentially feminine in their nature," wrote 19th century scholar Edward Vining, who suggested that Hamlet was actually a girl raised as a boy.
Litvin begins her historical account with a survey of the ubiquity of quotations from and allusions to Hamlet (particularly "to be or not to be" [of which more anon] and "The time is out of joint") in Arab political discourse.
Litvin demonstrates that the Hamlet productions before the 1967 Arab defeat produced a romantic national hero.
One less expurgated attempt at a section of Hamlet was made by the late, great comics pioneer Will Eisner, who adapted the whole of 'to be or not to be', to be spoken by a thug on a New York tenement roof.
Though Hamlet is not the only person in the play to see the ghost, he is the only one to whom the ghost speaks; and Hamlet remains skeptical until the play within the play that what the ghost has told him is reliable.
What can be said about Hamlet within the common idiom, having no systematic recourse to extraneous theories, has most assuredly already been said.