halophyte

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Related to halophytic: Holophytic nutrition

halophyte

a plant that is tolerant of high concentrations of salt in the soil and atmosphere and normally found close to the sea. For example, the marsh samphire, Salicornia europaea.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company, he said, had collaborated with ISHU to utilise saline water obtained during coal mining for growing halophytic fodder in Thar.
Field performance of halophytic species under irrigation with saline drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley of California.
One potential and climate resilient strategy is the introduction of those new crops, which can tolerate high levels of salinity in soil and may allow irrigation with saline water i.e., the use of halophytic crop plants (Koyro et al., 2008).
It is well-known that, at different periods of history, glass was produced by adding a flux, composed of natron (term here adopted with the meaning of usually complex, often polyphase evaporitic deposits rich in carbonates of sodium), or soda ash from the combustion of halophytic plants such as Salsola or Salicornia, or potash ash from the combustion of trees such as beech, birch, and oak, to quartz pebbles or quartz-limestone sand [1].
Halophytic plants can grow in wide variety of saline environment ranging from coastal marshes to inland deserts (Flowers and Colmer 2008).
The highly dynamic and productive microbial community inhabiting the halophytic vegetation is involved in various ecosystem services like photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, methanogenesis, production of antibiotics and enzymes and transformation of nutrients from detritus rich mangrove vegetation into the sources of nitrogen, phosphorus etc.
It includes halophytic, psammaphytic, tugai species (small trees and shrubs of the delta and river floodplains) and it is the source of seeds for the formation of new plant communities on the dry seafloor.
High apoplastic solute concentrations in leaves alter water relations of the halophytic shrub, Sarcobatus vermiculatus.
Seedlings of a variety of halophytic marsh species including Suaeda esteroa, estuary seablite, and Salicornia bigelovii, dwarf pickleweed, and a variety of coastal sage scrub species like Atriplex canescens, four-wing salt bush, have been successfully grown in greenhouses and transplanted for restoration purposes (Zedler 2001, Francis 2009).
All of them could be grouped under the definition of "halophytic gypsophiles" (Parsons, 1976), "gypsohalophytic species" (Denaeyer-De Smet, 1970) or "halothiophores" (Duvigneaud & Denaeyer-De Smet, 1968).