halo effect


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ha·lo ef·fect

1. the effect (usually beneficial) that the manner, attention, and caring of a provider have on a patient during a medical encounter, regardless of which medical procedure or services the encounter involves;
2. the influence on an observation of the observer's perception of the characteristics of the person observed (other than the characteristics under study) or the influence of the observer's recollection or knowledge of findings on a previous occasion.
The beneficial effect of a physician or other health care provider on a patient during a medical encounter, regardless of the therapy or procedure provided

halo effect

The beneficial effect of a physician or other health care provider on a Pt during a medical encounter, regardless of the therapy or procedure provided. See Hawthorne effect, Placebo effect, Physician invincibility syndrome.

ha·lo ef·fect

(hā'lō e-fekt')
1. The usually beneficial effect that the manner, attention, and caring of a provider have on a patient during a medical encounter, regardless of which medical procedure or services the encounter involves.
2. The influence on an observation of the observer's perception of the characteristics of the person observed (other than the characteristics under study) or the influence of the observer's recollection or knowledge of findings on a previous occasion.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Wood Daly said, one congregation in Toronto's Bloor and Yonge area was found to have a halo effect of about $1.5 million; if governments eliminated tax exemptions--property tax, rebates to sales tax and personal tax credits to donors--to faith communities, they would get about $366,000 from the same congregation.
One of the earliest and most enduring studies of first impressions and the halo effect was completed by psychologist Solomon Asch, who asked people to evaluate the personalities of two individuals name Alan and Ben.
There's more to the "halo effect" than just being seen.
According to Kahneman, the halo effect is common largely because this approach is easier and requires less mental effort than evaluating information in a consistent and objective fashion, regardless of when it is received.
The halo effect is "the tendency to like (or dislike) everything about a person - including things you have not observed" - based on one trait or experience with them.
The halo effect from EMV will not last long -- only a few short years -- because of the normalization process of EMV in the public domain.
The goal was to create a halo effect of a different sort, to woo elusive younger buyers who these days are less likely than their predecessors to drive.
(Incidentally, no correlation was found between actual intelligence and attractiveness for either sex.) In short, the study said, because the halo effect of attractiveness is stronger for women (whereby good looks translate to other perceived positive attributes) people aren't used to thinking about what a smart woman looks like.
A halo effect from the renovations and the presence of wellness ambassadors has lifted sales in various categories, especially health-oriented segments, notes Martindale.
The company hopes that the global media coverage of Xbox One's upcoming launch will create a "halo effect" for Microsoft's consoles generally, to keep the Xbox 360's sales strong until the launch of the newest device.
Automotive News has reported that the automaker has taken this decision after its executives decided that the model's halo effect would not be worth the substantial investment it involved.
Washington, April 2 ( ANI ): Studies have shown that "organic" label can lead us to think that a food is healthier, through what is known as the 'health halo effect'.