halitophobia

hal·i·to·pho·bi·a

(hal'i-tō-fō'bē-ă),
An exaggerated fear of having bad breath.
[halitosis + phobia]

halitophobia

(hal″ĭt-ō-fō′bē-ă) [ halito(sis) + -phobia]
Excessive and unwarranted concern about having bad-smelling breath.

hal·i·to·pho·bi·a

(hal'i-tō-fō'bē-ă)
An exaggerated fear of having bad breath.
[halitosis + phobia]
References in periodicals archive ?
This includes people suffering from pseudo halitosis (the condition is clinically absent), denied halitosis (do not accept the existence of the condition),3 and halitophobia (having an exaggerated fear of halitosis).4
Halitophobia assessed as psychosomatic disorders related to dentistry affect at least 0.5-1% of the adult population (25).
Diagnostic methods of halitosis enable differentiation of genuine halitosis, pseudohalitosis and halitophobia. Therefore, assessment of diagnosis and severity of halitosis is important to prevent incorrect or unnecessary treatment (21).
There's even halitophobia, when people are convinced they have bad breath but don't.
Halitosis can be classified into categories of genuine halitosis, pseudo-halitosis, and halitophobia. (3) Halitosis may be an important factor in social communication and psychological alterations leading to social and personal isolation.
This paradoxical situation has been classified as halitophobia, an important psychological problem that needs to be addressed with non-oral clinical strategies.
(9) Once a thorough assessment has been completed, the dental hygienist can then classify the halitosis as genuine (extra-oral or intra-oral origins), pseudo or, in rare cases, as halitophobia. Understanding extra-oral and intra-oral origins is important for determining the appropriate course of treatment.
Those who suffer from breath halitophobia usually tire themselves out to hide bad breath by constantly brushing their teeth, chewing gum, sucking sweets and mints.
It's not always easy to tell whether you have bad breath, although some people suffer from a psychological condition called halitophobia. They have an unshakeable belief that their breath smells, although in fact it does not.
New research points to more and more halitophobia - where someone imagines they have bad breath when they don't.
Yaegaki and Coil (2000)5 classified halitosis into three categories: Genuine halitosis, Pseudo-halitosis and Halitophobia.
(14) Furthermore, there are people who do not have bad breath, but are convinced that they have oral malodor (halitophobia).