hairy leukoplakia


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Related to hairy leukoplakia: lichen planus, Kaposi Sarcoma, Oral candidiasis

hair·y leu·ko·pla·ki·a

a white lesion appearing on the tongue, occasionally on the buccal mucosa, of patients with AIDS; a manifestation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in an immunocompromised host. The lesion appears raised, with a corrugated, shaggy, or "hairy" surface due to keratin projections.
An Epstein-Barr-associated condition seen in HIV infection, which is characterised by a condyloma-like tongue mass—75% of patients have HPV, 95% have EBV—in epithelial cell nuclei preceding the onset of clinical AIDS

hairy leukoplakia

Oral pathology An EBV-associated condition seen in HIV infection, characterized by a condyloma-like tongue mass–75% have HPV, 95% have EBV in epithelial cell nuclei preceding clinical AIDS. See AIDS.

hair·y leu·ko·pla·ki·a

(hār'ē lū'kō-plā'kē-ă)
A white lesion appearing on the tongue or buccal mucosa of immunocompromised patients; the lesion appears raised, with a corrugated or "hairy" surface. Seen in patients with HIV/AIDS, it has been associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Condition is usually benign and subsides with therapy.
See also: leukoplakia

hair·y leu·ko·pla·ki·a

(hār'ē lū'kō-plā'kē-ă)
White raised lesion seen on tongue, occasionally on buccal mucosa, in an immunocompromised host.
References in periodicals archive ?
(49%), enlargement of Oral candidiasis and the parotid glands hairy leukoplakia were (13%), oral positive predictors candidiasis (11%), for progression of the hairy leukoplakia disease.
The most common oral mucosa lesions that can be found after thorough oral examination of renal transplant recipients are gingival hyperplasia, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia and saburral tongue (39).
These oral lesions are strongly associated to low CD4+ count and high viral load.2 Antiretroviral therapy is given to HIV/AIDS patients that usually consists of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) alongwith non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or protease inhibitor (PI).3 Antiretroviral therapy reduces the viral load by inhibiting the viral replication and results in the reconstitution of the immune system alongwith the increase in CD4+ lymphocyte count.4 Frequency of oral lesions has been reported to be decreased after antiretroviral therapy (ART) especially in case of oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, necrotizing periodontal conditions and various AIDS related malignancies like Kaposi sarcoma.5
Happonen, "Oral hairy leukoplakia is not a specific sign of HIV-infection but related to immunosuppression in general," Journal of Oral Pathology and Medicine, vol.
Oral hairy leukoplakia is most often seen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and in patients with other immunosuppressive conditions.
Other lesions observed were Kaposi's sarcoma, Multifocal Epithelial Hyperplasia, Oral Hairy Leukoplakia, Linear Gingival Erythema, and oral ulceration (Figure 1).
(4) Specifically, in the oral environment the lesions associated with HIV infection include candidiasis, herpes simplex, oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL), cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, varicella-zoster virus infection, papilloma virus infection, linear gingival erythema (LGE), gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis, Kaposi's sarcoma, and aphthous ulcers, which are acknowledged as important markers of AIDS clinical stages.
He was clinically anaemic with no signs of oral hairy leukoplakia or candida.
About a third of the patients in the general medical ward had oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia, but they had not been tested for HIV The hospital had a laboratory that performed CD4 counts for all the CTCs in the Mtwara region, with couriers bringing blood daily for testing.
Oral lesions are frequent in HIV infection, especially candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and periodontal disease.
Regression of oral hairy leukoplakia after orally administered acyclovir therapy.