hairworm


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Related to hairworm: horsehair worm

Trichostrongylus

(trik'ō-stron'ji-lŭs),
The hairworm, or bankrupt or black scour worm; an economically important genus (about 30 species) of small slender nematodes (family Trichostrongylidae) that inhabit the small intestine, in some cases the stomach, of a variety of herbivorous animals and gallinaceous birds. They burrow into the mucosa and suck blood; in large numbers they do serious damage, especially to young hosts.
[tricho- + G. strongylos, round]

hairworm

(hâr′wûrm′)
n.
2. Any of various slender parasitic nematode worms, especially those of the genus Trichostrongylus that infest the stomach and small intestine of cattle, sheep, and related animals, and those of the genus Capillaria that infest the digestive system of poultry and other animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, it is not clear whether the hairworm larvae were developing or just encysted in these hosts.
Hairworm and nematode infections in North American Orthoptera.
n., (Gordioidea: Nematomorpha), a hairworm parasite of ground beetles (Carabidae: Coleoptera) with a summary of gordiid parasites from Carabidae.
The hairworm, Gordius robustus Leidy, as a parasite of the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex Haldeman.
ABSTRACT -- The present work reviews the hosts, distributions, synonyms and taxonomic characters of North American hairworms (Gordioidea: Nematomorpha) and presents a key based on adult morphological characters that can be observed under the dissecting and light microscopes.
Hairworms, or Gordioidea, are fresh water members of the Phylum Nematomorpha.
The present work reviews the hosts, distributions, synonyms and taxonomic characters used in the identification of North American hairworms and presents a key based on adult morphological characters that can be observed under the dissecting and light microscopes (Fig.
Diagnostic characters of adult hairworms include: 1) the presence and nature of the areoles (raised areas on the cuticle), especially their type, shape, size, arrangement, and association with pore canals, bristles, warts and papillae, 2) body shape, size and color pattern, especially that associated with the anterior (calotte) and posterior ends and, 3) features of the male tail, including first, whether it is simple or forked and then if it bears preor postcloacal ridges, folds, hairlines, bristle fields or tubercles.
When available, scanning electron microscopy is a useful tool for studying fine details on the surface of hairworms. However this technique is not necessary for identification purposes if good light microscopes are available.
Basically, all hairworms develop inside invertebrates, with a free-living stage in an aquatic habitat where mating and oviposition occur.