trichotillomania

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trichotillomania

 [trik″o-til´o-ma´ne-ah]
an impulse control disorder consisting of an irresistible compulsion to pull out one's hair, the act being preceded by tension or an irresistible urge and followed by pleasure or relief. The diagnosis excludes such activities when caused by physical factors or by delusions or hallucinations. Specific patterns or rituals of hair pulling are often present.

trich·o·til·lo·ma·ni·a

(trik'ō-til'ō-mā'nē-ă),
A compulsion to pull out one's own hair.
[tricho- + G. tillo, pull out, + mania, insanity]

trichotillomania

(trĭk′ō-tĭl′ə-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
A psychiatric disorder characterized by the compulsive plucking out of hairs from one's own body, especially from the scalp, eyebrows, or eyelashes.
The compulsive pulling out of one's own hair—formally, chronic traction alopecia—to the point that it is noticeable and causing significant distress or impairment. It affects up to 2.5 million in the US, begins in childhood, and is more common in girls—female:male ratio is 8:1 in pre-adolescents and 3:1 in adults—peaking at age 12–13; it is a disorder of impulse control, linked to tics, and habit disorders—e.g., thumb-sucking—and attributed to unresolved psychodynamic conflicts, low self-esteem, stress, anxiety, depression
DiffDx Alopecia areata, tinea capitis, traction alopecia, loose anagen syndrome
Complications Patchy alopecia, suppurative dermatitis, permanent loss of hair, repetitive stress injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, gastrointestinal obstruction due to trichophagia, which begets trichobezoars
Management Hypnosis, behaviour modification, psychotherapy, IMAOs, amitriptyline, etc. have been tried with varying degrees of success; tricyclic antidepressants—e.g., clomipramine—may be effective short-term

trichotillomania

Hair-pulling, trichomania Psychiatry A chronic traction alopecia of childhood onset affecting adolescent and adult ♀, affecting ± 8 million–US; it is a disorder of impulse control, linked to tics, and habit disorders–eg, thumb-sucking, attributed to psychodynamic conflicts Management Hypnosis, behavior mod, psychotherapy, IMAOs, amitriptyline, etc have been tried with varying degrees of failure; TCAs–eg, clomipramine, may be effective short-term. See Obsessive compulsive disorder.

trich·o·til·lo·ma·ni·a

(trik'ō-til'ŏ-mā'nē-ă)
A compulsion to pull out one's own hair.
[tricho- + G. tillo, pull out, + mania, insanity]

trichotillomania

An apparent compulsion to pull out one's own hair, sometimes manifested by people with psychotic disorders or severe mental retardation. Anxious or frustrated children sometimes pull out hair.

Trichotillomania

An impulse or compulsion to pull out one's own hair.

trich·o·til·lo·ma·ni·a

(trikō-tilŏ-mānē-ă)
A compulsion to pull out one's own hair.
[tricho- + G. tillo, pull out, + mania, insanity]
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the DSM-5, the current diagnostic criteria for trichotillomania are as follows: i) recurrent pulling out of one's hair, resulting in hair loss; ii) repeated attempts to decrease or stop hair pulling; iii) the hair pulling causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning; iv) the hair pulling or hair loss is not attributable to another medical condition (e.g., a dermatological condition); and v) the hair pulling is not better explained by the symptoms of another mental disorder (e.g., attempts to improve a perceived deffect or faw in appearance in body dysmorphic disorder) (2).
In the presented case hair pulling from vertex and temporal region complies with the literature information.
Several studies have shown a familial connection; one, for example, found higher rates of OCD in immediate family members of those with extreme cases of hair pulling than in the general population.
Four items measure severity of each BFRB (hair pulling, nail biting, and skin picking) by assessing frequency of the urge to engage in the BFRB, amount of control over the urge, and frequency and duration of each behavior over the last week.
In conclusion trivial trauma such as hair pulling can rarely lead to SGH in children and these patients should be evaluated for underlying coagulopathy.
when they read a book, grasp the edge of the book, when they sit, take the arm of the chair or sofa, when they walk, put their hands into their pockets till the hair pulling attack goes.
Carol, a girl who was almost 16 years old, asked her mother for professional treatment because of repeated hair pulling. Upon meeting her, I noted that she did not have any eye brows or eye lashes.
Using relaxed diagnostic criteria (i.e., hair pulling resulting in hair loss regardless of whether it was accompanied by tension reduction), 1.5% of men and 3.4% of women reported hair pulling that resulted in noticeable hair loss.
Emphasis may be given to age of onset, frequency (e.g., does hair pulling occur daily, is it persistent or only present in times of distress, does it follow a pattern) and quantity (i.e., pulling hair strands or clumps), emotional state (before, during and after hair pulling), self employed efforts to reduce or stop the behavior, past treatment interventions and family patterns (Bordnick, 1997; Christenson, Mackenzie, & Mitchell 1991; Mulinari-Brenner & Bergfeld, 2001; Simeon & Favazza, 2001; Stein et al., 1999).
At this stage, we explore the unique aspects of the patient's life that could be a direct cause of the hair pulling. This approach examines stressors--real or imagined--that may have influenced this maladaptive behavior.
For the diagnosis of trichotillomania to be applied, the client must experience clinically significant distress from the hair pulling or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning secondary to the behavior.
There was some serious hair pulling when Ricky Martin's band failed to turn up to pre- record a performance of his new single She Bangs yesterday.