cerebral hemorrhage

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Related to haemorrhagic stroke: ischemic stroke

hemorrhage

 [hem´ŏ-rij]
the escape of blood from a ruptured vessel; it can be either external or internal. Blood from an artery is bright red in color and comes in spurts; that from a vein is dark red and comes in a steady flow. Aside from the obvious flow of blood from a wound or body orifice, massive hemorrhage can be detected by other signs, such as restlessness, cold and clammy skin, thirst, increased and thready pulse, rapid and shallow respirations, and a drop in blood pressure. If the hemorrhage continues unchecked, the patient may complain of visual disturbances, ringing in the ears, or extreme weakness.
capillary hemorrhage oozing of blood from minute vessels.
cerebral hemorrhage a hemorrhage into the cerebrum; one of the three main causes of cerebral vascular accident (stroke syndrome).
concealed hemorrhage internal hemorrhage.
fibrinolytic hemorrhage that due to abnormalities of fibrinolysis and not hypofibrinogenemia.
internal hemorrhage that in which the extravasated blood remains within the body.
intracranial hemorrhage bleeding within the cranium, which may be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid, or cerebral.
petechial hemorrhage subcutaneous hemorrhage occurring in minute spots.
postpartum hemorrhage that which follows soon after labor.
primary hemorrhage that which soon follows an injury.
secondary hemorrhage that which follows an injury after a considerable lapse of time.

ce·re·bral hem·or·rhage

hemorrhage into the substance of the cerebrum, usually in the region of the internal capsule by the rupture of the lenticulostriate artery.

intracerebral haemorrhage

A generic term for haemorrhage within the cerebral parenchyma which, when superficial, is most commonly caused by contusions and, if deep, more often linked to hypertension and occurs in the putamen, thalamus, internal capsule, cerebellum or pons.

cerebral hemorrhage

Brain bleed Neurology Abrupt bleeding into cerebral tissue, which may be 2º to HTN, ASHD malformations or trauma. See Arteriovenous malformation, Berry aneurysm, Cerebrovascular accident, Stroke, Subdural hematoma.

ce·re·bral hem·or·rhage

(ser'ĕ-brăl hem'ŏr-ăj)
Hemorrhage into the substance of the cerebrum, usually in the region of the internal capsule by the rupture of the lenticulostriate artery.
Synonym(s): hematencephalon.
ŏ

ce·re·bral hem·or·rhage

(ser'ĕ-brăl hem'ŏr-ăj)
Hemorrhage into substance of cerebrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, daily egg consumers (up to one egg/day) had a 26% lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke -- the type of stroke with a higher prevalence rate in China than in high-income countries -- a 28% lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke death and an 18% lower risk of CVD death.
13.6% of the patients with Thrombotic stroke and 25% of patients with Haemorrhagic stroke had serum cholesterol values greater than 240 mg%.
"We urgently need to find effective ways to prevent the devastation that haemorrhagic stroke can bring, as well preventing and managing conditions with a higher risk of stroke, such as AF and high blood pressure."
However studies show that haemorrhagic stroke constitutes a larger percentage in Asians.
The vast majority of strokes in this trial were ischaemic while the number who experienced haemorrhagic strokes was very small.
Haemorrhagic strokes are caused by a bleed in the brain not a blockage, which is an ischaemic stroke.
In persons with hypertension (n= 32), we found haemorrhagic stroke is the commonest cause (31.2%) of acute confusional state.
After the first two weeks, the risk dropped steadily but remained elevated during at least the first six weeks for ischaemic stroke and the first 12 weeks for haemorrhagic stroke.
Experts said this meant that once other factors were taken into account, being four inches taller equated to a 30pc reduced risk of haemorrhagic stroke.
in the "- lower | by up on But how the which la lo n s e h 28% lower risk of dying from haemorrhagic stroke if you eat an egg a day
Overall the age range and median years for those who had non-haemorrhagic stroke and haemorrhagic stroke were 23 to 95 and 58 years; and 26 to 75 and 50 years respectively.
An international team of researchers has found that for every 1,250 people there is the chance of one extra haemorrhagic stroke - bleeding in the brain.