hemorrhagic shock

(redirected from haemorrhagic shock)

hem·or·rhag·ic shock

hypovolemic shock resulting from acute hemorrhage, characterized by hypotension, tachycardia, pale, cold, and clammy skin, and oliguria.

hem·or·rhag·ic shock

(hem'ŏr-aj'ik shok)
Hypovolemic shock resulting from acute hemorrhage, characterized by hypotension; tachycardia; pale, cold, and clammy skin; and oliguria.
Synonym(s): haemorrhagic shock.

hem·or·rhag·ic shock

(hem'ŏr-aj'ik shok)
Hypovolemic shock resulting from acute hemorrhage, characterized by hypotension; tachycardia; pale, cold, and clammy skin; and oliguria.
Synonym(s): haemorrhagic shock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical application of limited fluid resuscitation in treatment before operation of hepatic and splenic injury and haemorrhagic shock. Clin H Med Offic.
Urinary tract infection was the most common postoperative morbidity (37.04%) followed by wound infection (29.63%), bladder injury (18.52%) and haemorrhagic shock (14.81%).
The two victims died of haemorrhagic shock caused by multiple stab wounds caused by a sharp object.
Tissue ischemia microdialysis assessments following severe traumatic haemorrhagic shock: lactate/pyruvate ratio as a new resuscitation end point?
Nasal aspergillosis was recorded in 10 years old black Labrador dog which died of haemorrhagic shock due to epistaxis.
"In this time period we have unfortunately also lost 14 special forces personnel due to severe trauma cases, including head injuries, fractures and haemorrhagic shock," said Shaikh Khalid.
By yesterday, 11 had died - apparently from either blood poisoning or haemorrhagic shock, which occurs when a person has lost too much blood, state deputy health director Amar Singh told the Press Trust of India news agency.
By yesterday, eight had died - apparently from either blood poisoning or haemorrhagic shock, which occurs when a person has lost too much blood.
Majority of victims died due to Haemorrhagic shock (57.14%), which was followed by Asphyxial deaths contributing in 24.37% of cases (Table 6).
According to the American College of Surgeons (ACS), the general concept behind damage control resuscitation and surgery is to control life-threatening bleeding and contamination which must be terminated as soon as possible in order for the patient to undergo correction of physiologic abnormalities due to haemorrhagic shock or sepsis.