haemoptysis


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haemoptysis

he·mop·ty·sis

(hē-mop'ti-sis)
The spitting of blood derived from the lungs or bronchial tubes as a result of pulmonary or bronchial hemorrhage.
Synonym(s): haemoptysis.
[hemo- + G. ptysis, a spitting]

haemoptysis

Coughing up blood. This is most often an indication of BRONCHITIS or BRONCHIECTASIS or the result of a bout of heavy coughing but may also be caused by TUBERCULOSIS or, more probably nowadays, lung cancer.

he·mop·ty·sis

(hē-mop'ti-sis)
Spitting of blood derived from lungs or bronchial tubes as a result of pulmonary or bronchial hemorrhage.
Synonym(s): haemoptysis.
[hemo- + G. ptysis, a spitting]
References in periodicals archive ?
Active tuberculosis (TB) continues to be the leading cause of haemoptysis worldwide.
8 The commonest presenting symptoms in our study were cough, dyspnea, chest pain, fever, haemoptysis and loss of weight and studies by other investigators11-13 had reported cough, dyspnea, chest pain and haemoptysis as chief presenting complaints.
Clinically, it could also be characterized by recurrent pneumothorax, haemoptysis or chylous pleural effusions.
Box 1 Common signs and symptoms of tuberculosis (Davies 2003) The following are signs and symptoms that would be suggestive of an active TB infection: * Cough for more than three weeks, with or without sputum production * Loss of appetite * Weight loss * Night sweats * Lethargy * Lymphadenopathy * Pyrexia of unknown origin * Haemoptysis * Other focal signs and symptoms dependant on the site of disease It is important to note that not all patients will present with the above symptoms.
Fatal haemoptysis in a case of lymphomatoid granulomatosis treated with rituximab.
There was no history of trauma, cough, haemoptysis, anorexia and weight loss or similar disease in his family.
Patients with a history of significant haemoptysis (coughing up blood) or unstable disease were excluded.
At 24 hours after admission, the patient suddenly developed massive haemoptysis with severe hypoxia, along with a new-onset anemia (hemoglobin level, 8-8 g/dL) compared to the hospital admission value of 13-3 g/dL (Table 1).
Symptoms such as the history of fever, cough, sputum, haemoptysis, dyspnoea, chest pain, weight loss, loss of appetite and night sweats were recorded and analyzed.
She died in that hospital from haemoptysis (the spitting of blood originating from the respiratory tract below the level of the larynx), aspergillosis (a lung condition) and bronchiectasis, known as Joab's Disease.