haemolysis


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he·mol·y·sis

(hē-mol'i-sis)
Alteration, dissolution, or destruction of red blood cells in such a manner that hemoglobin is liberated into the medium in which the cells are suspended.
Synonym(s): erythrocytolysis, erythrolysis, hematolysis, haemolysis.
[hemo- + G. lysis, destruction]

haemolysis

Destruction of red blood cells by rupture of the cell envelope and release of the contained HAEMOGLOBIN. This occurs when red cells are placed in fluids more dilute than serum or as a result of an immune-mediated process. It may result from excessive trauma to red cells as in passage through artificial heart valves. Haemolysis also occurs when there is an inherent weakness in the cell membrane as in HEREDITARY SPHEROCYTOSIS. It also occurs in many other conditions including GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY, various HAEMOGLOBINOPATHIES, THALASSAEMIA, rhesus factor incompatibility (ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS) and vitamin K overdosage.

haemolysis

the disintegration of red blood cells, with the release of HAEMOGLOBIN. The process can occur
  1. when the cells take in excess water by OSMOSIS,
  2. when there is an antigen-antibody reaction involving the cells, as in RHESUS HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA,
  3. as a result of an abnormality such as FAVISM. Addition of glacial acetic acid to a blood sample causes haemolysis of the red blood cells, thus making it easier to observe and count the white blood cells.

he·mol·y·sis

(hē-mol'i-sis)
Alteration, dissolution, or destruction of red blood cells in such a manner that hemoglobin is liberated into the medium in which the cells are suspended.
Synonym(s): haemolysis.
[hemo- + G. lysis, destruction]
References in periodicals archive ?
Haemolysis as an influence and interference factor in clinical chemistry.
In Acute Viral Hepatitis, haemolysis is usually mild, rarely there is a drop in haemoglobin level more then 1-2g/dl.7 It is treatable without any complications.
coli isolates in this study were negative for hlyA gene which means that haemolysis on sheep blood agar might be due to haemolysins other than a-haemolysin (Fatima et al., 2012).
Specialist investigations for non-immune haemolysis were performed, namely Hb electrophoresis, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase screen and unstable Hb analysis, which were all within normal limits.
Caeridin-a1 was also found to induce haemolysis at higher concentrations, whereby 18% haemolysis was detected at 32 [micro]M, which consequently decreases its potential therapeutic value.
His renal function remains stable at a new baseline creatinine of 130 [micro]mol/L and there is no evidence of haemolysis.
Brodbeck, "Intravascular haemolysis and septicaemia due to Clostridium perfringens liver abscess," Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, vol.
SI Metal nanoparticles Optical density (OD) Haemolysis number (MNPs) percentage (%) 1.
Hypothetically, some of the protective effects of both famine and sickle cell trait in malaria might be attributed to increased premature haemolysis of infected erythrocytes due to oxidative stress.
PNH is a debilitating, ultra-rare, life-threatening blood disorder in which uncontrolled activation of complement, a component of the immune system, results in haemolysis (destruction of a patient's red blood cells).
AII.1 displayed chronic haemolysis and jaundice since infancy; she was diagnosed with PK deficiency on the basis of decreased enzyme activity and splenectomised in 1979 at the age of 21.